Alison Treaster

For the first time in history, a team of athletes comprised entirely of refugees is competing in the Olympic games. Ten athletes from Syria, the Democratic Republic of Congo, South Sudan and Ethiopia comprise the official Refugee Olympic Team. The International Olympic Committee formed the team to protect athletes who were forced to flee their home countries due to international crises. Displacement from their homes leaves them without a national Olympic committee to support them, without a flag to wear on their chests, without an anthem to play on the podium following their hoped-for victories. In 2016, these athletes reflect the unity represented by the Olympics rings as they compete in swimming, judo and various track and field events. Learn more about these incredible athletes here.

Once again, the Olympics has provided common ground for athletes to represent their countries and for fans to show their national pride by embracing the diversity while uniting through sports. Perhaps those of us watching can carry forward that notion of common ground and be mindful of the contributions of the individuals we encounter daily in our cities, our workplaces and among our neighbors.

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Pittsburgh has jobs: more than 20,000 across 10 counties. Tap into ImaginePittsburgh.com to explore southwestern PA’s trending careers and industries.

Find a job, advance your career, build a life you’ll love: ImaginePittsburgh.com.

ImaginePittsburgh.com

Follow us on Facebook/AthenaPittsburgh and Twitter/AthenaPgh. #AthenaPgh

Learn what makes a winning ATHENA nomination at Athena-Pittsburgh.com

It’s that time again — time to recognize the extraordinary women in the Pittsburgh region who go above and beyond in their work and mentorship of other women. Nominations for the 2016 Greater Pittsburgh ATHENA Awards will be accepted (online only) until 5 p.m. on Thursday, June 30.

Taking its name from the Greek goddess of strength and wisdom, the traditional ATHENA Award recognizes a woman who demonstrates excellence in her profession, contributes to her community and helps other women to succeed. Last year’s recipient was  Lynn M. Banaszak, executive director at Health Innovation in Pennsylvania Disruptive Health Technology Institute at Carnegie Mellon University. Josie Badger, Parent Education and Advocacy Leadership (PEAL) Center’s youth development director, received the ATHENA Young Professional Award for emerging leaders age 35 or younger.

Wondering how to craft a winning nomination? Check out this tip sheet put together by Pittsburgh Magazine Publisher Betsy Benson.

There are hundreds of ATHENA International-affiliated events presented around the world each year, but Pittsburgh’s gathering is one of the largest. More than 900 women and men are expected to attend this year’s luncheon on Monday, Sept. 26 at the Westin Convention Center Hotel in Downtown Pittsburgh.

Interested in sponsorship? Contact sgaal@alleghenyconference.org.

Watch videos, learn more at Athena-Pittsburgh.com. / Look for updates under #PghAthena on Facebook and Twitter.

 

little nav imageAre you new to Pittsburgh? Are you new to the United States? Are you looking for ways to succeed in the region as an immigrant or refugee? Are you trying to understand the new system and lifestyle? If you answered yes to any of these questions, consider attending the free, first-ever Navigating Pittsburgh Summit on from 9 a.m .to 4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 8 at the Heinz History Center in the Strip District.

Those who have recently moved to the area, especially refugees and immigrants from medium to low-income, are invited to register and attend this event in order to acclimate themselves to their new home. In order to accommodate the language needs of refugees and immigrants, workshops will be interpreted into Nepali, Portuguese, and Spanish. Attendees are asked to pre-register on the Navigating Pittsburgh website. Transportation shuttles will be available from several neighborhoods. Free refreshments and child care will also be offered.

The day-long event will feature workshops on several topics focused on five main pillars: civic knowledge, education, financial capability, health and wellness, and community engagement. Local professionals from both the public and private sectors will present on the areas of their expertise and answer questions. Attendees will also be able to speak directly to representatives from several local resources, such as the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Consumer Health Coalition and agencies participating in the Immigrant Service and Connections (ISAC) program. “This event was created with the needs of immigrants and newcomers in mind. It also demonstrates the commitment of organizations and affinity groups in the region, to welcome immigrants and help them succeed,” said Jesabel Rivera-Guerra, chair of Navigating Pittsburgh.

After identifying the need for newcomers across the board, a collaborative, centralized event for new arrivals to the area to connect to a wide array of needs was born. Navigating Pittsburgh was created by board members of Casa San Jose, a social service agency that works with Latino immigrants. “Navigating Pittsburgh is a concrete expression of welcoming those who are new to our region and providing them with tools to promote their integration and self-sufficiency,” said Sister Janice Vanderneck, executive director of Casa San José. Donations will benefit the work of Casa San Jose.

This event at the Heinz History Center will be a unique opportunity to discover Pittsburgh while you connect with key people that will help you transform from a newcomer to a successful contributor to the community, and to achieve your goals – whatever they may be. Learn more at NavigatingPgh.com.

Thanks to our valued sponsors and collaborators, including: 

Vibrant Pittsburgh / Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh / Casa San José / Latin American Cultural Union / 

Highmark BCBS / Pittsburgh Urban Magnet Project / PPG Paints

NEXTpittsburgh

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Pittsburgh, skyline, three rivers, point, fountain
Photo Courtesy NEXTpittsburgh

Pittsburgh has done it again.

The Economist has ranked Pittsburgh as the most livable city in the continental United States, squeaking in just under Honolulu.

Not bad, considering Hawaii is a vacation destination.

This marks the second time that the esteemed journal of global economies has ranked Pittsburgh at or near the top. The Economist first designated Pittsburgh as the most livable city in America in 2009. But you won’t find it online.

The news is buried in a report issued by The Economist Intelligence Unit that was the basis for the article–more of a graphic image really–reported in The Economist of the top worldwide cities. Melbourne tops the list, followed by Vienna, Vancover and Toronto. Pittsburgh ranked No. 30 out of 140 cities surveyed.

VisitPITTSBURGH uncovered the info and sent out a news release earlier today and, at our request, sent the actual report including a full listing of rankings for Pittsburgh.

“Pittsburgh has the goods,” said Craig Davis, president and CEO of VisitPITTSBURGH. “We have received so much buzz in the last 10 years and it has helped us tremendously. This kind of success begets more success. We’re riding a wave.”

The Economist defines the concept of livability as a “simple assessment” that determines “locations around the world (that) provide the best or the worst living conditions.”

The study notes that those cities scoring best “tend to be mid-sized cities in wealthier countries with a relatively low population density. This can foster a range of recreational activities without leading to high crime levels or overburdened infrastructure.”

Here’s how Pittsburgh ranked in the following categories on a scale of 1-100, with 100 being considered “ideal”: stability rating 85; healthcare 92; culture and environment 91; education 100; and infrastructure 100.

Pittsburgh was four points behind Honolulu and ahead of Washington, D.C., Chicago and Atlanta and the rest of America.

While The Economist rankings definitely have “street cred,” it was the Places Rated Almanac that really put Pittsburgh on the map in 2007, says Craig.

Since 2000, Pittsburgh has made more than 200 “best” lists including “40 Prettiest Cities in the World” (Huffington Post), “Most Entrepreneurial City in the America (Inc.), “Most Livable City in America” (Forbes) and “Best Places in the World to Visit in 2012″ (National Geographic Traveler).

Pittsburgh is the only city in the country that has been twice named to Places Rated Almanac.

 

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Looking for a job? Pittsburgh’s got ‘em — more than 22,000 open positions across the 10-county region. Check out our powerful job search aggregator at ImaginePittsburgh.com/work.

Find a job, advance your career, build a life you’ll love: ImaginePittsburgh.com.

 

Phil Cynar

Paris3013blogspotcomMaybe your bucket list of the places you’ll go just got larger thanks to the return of nonstop air service from Pittsburgh to Paris. Back from its annual winter hiatus, nonstop service on Delta Air Lines from Pittsburgh International to Paris Charles de Gaulle (CDG) is crossing The Pond five days per week to the advantage of both business and leisure travelers.

Because of successful bookings and peak summer vacation travel to Europe in 2013, Delta has resumed its nonstop service from Pittsburgh for the sixth consecutive year.

Flying nonstop from Pittsburgh to Paris and beyond on Delta allows travelers to avoid the busiest and most congested east coast hubs while providing ease of use of Pittsburgh International-based customs and border protection.

Nonstop from Pittsburgh to Paris is the considered the fastest way to get to Europe and beyond. From Paris CGD, travelers can get to 100-plus destinations in Europe, Asia, India and the Middle East on Delta and its partners Air France, KLM and Alitalia. Top destinations for travelers from Pittsburgh International connecting through Paris CDG include Rome, Amsterdam, Budapest, Berlin, Barcelona, Dusseldorf, Munich, Frankfurt, Prague, Bombay/Mumbai, Istanbul and London.

It’s an impressive list of destinations – one that emphasizes that “oh, the places you’ll go” (a tip of the hat to Dr. Seuss) are more convenient and comfortable to get to via Pittsburgh International.

Stay planning your next trip abroad at FlyPittsburgh.com.

Bonnie Pfister

Rehka Shukla is comfortable living and working across cultures. Born in India but raised in Wisconsin, she studied East Asian economic and political development in New York before heading to Thailand to work in the nonprofit sector. But when she and her journalist husband decided to start a family 15 years ago, they looked for a place back in the United States where they could continue work with an international bent AND afford to raise a family. That led them to Mount Lebanon, a suburban community just several light-rail stops south of downtown.

“You have this image of Pittsburgh having been this smoky, oppressive urban environment,” Shukla said. “It (is) anything but that.”

Shukla and her family love the region for its rich outdoor amenities, theater and other cultural events and a warm circle of friends – some life-long residents, others equally “new” to the region.

You learn more by watching Shukla’s video below, or reading her Neighbor profile on ImaginePittsburgh.com, a virtual concierge that highlights work, play and live options in the 10-county region. You can read about other Neighbors, look for a job among the tens of thousands gathered by our powerful job aggregator, sign up for updates about the region through our social media channels or RRS feeds and take the “Find Yourself in Pittsburgh!” quiz to be matched up with Neighbors who may share your interests and have tips on what’s fun and engaging to do in the region.