More than 2,640 people have found jobs through ShaleNET, a comprehensive recruitment, training, placement and retention program for high-demand, hard-to-fill entry-level jobs across the Marcellus Shale footprint. That’s according to the March newsletter of the ShaleNET initiative, which was launched in July 2010.

A ShaleNET intro to oil and gas operations class at the Bushy Run Center near Export, Pa. Photo Copyright Darrell Sapp/Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
A ShaleNET intro to oil and gas operations class at the Bushy Run Center near Export, Pa. Photo Copyright Darrell Sapp/Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Industry leaders, policy makers and educators will discuss ShaleNET at 10 a.m. Tuesday, March 26 at Westmoreland County Community College, which is one of the educational institutions sponsoring the program. Individuals interested in learning more about training should check out the Resources and Training Providers tabs at ShaleNET.org.

As the first, $5 million round of ShaleNET funding for training programs in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio and New York winds down later this year, the second round grant of $15 million is gathering steam to expand the program’s reach with additional classes this fall.

With the maturing of the industry and with the additional money, participants will be able to continue their education and training by earning certificates and two-year degrees that will help them find jobs in the midstream and downstream part of the industry – beyond the drill rigs and in the processing of oil and natural gas. The program will also expand its geographic scope, reaching further into Ohio and into Texas through partnerships with Stark State College in Canton, Ohio, and Navarro College in Corsicana, Texas. The hope is that ShaleNET can be scaled into a national job training and education model.

To learn more or to sign up for the newsletter, visit ShaleNET.org.