Bonnie Pfister

Every week it seems another national publication deems Pittsburgh to be the “next” Brooklyn, Portland, San Francisco, etc. It’s flattering, although we don’t happen to think we need to be the next anything. The attention just underscores what we already knew: good things are percolating here. Cool jobs. Hot industries. Longstanding employers doing cutting-edge R&D in healthcare and with materials and metals that will make airplanes and autos faster and more fuel-efficent.

The point is, isn’t it time you came home and became a part of it all? Um, yes. Because jobs.

There are more than 20,000 jobs open today across southwestern PA. You can explore them all at one place: ImaginePittsburgh.com. That’s the region’s digital hub for information about hot careers, industries and employers. Our custom-built aggregator pulls listings from such sites as LinkedIn, Career Builder, Monster and quite literally a thousand others – so you don’t have to. Here are just a few of nifty places now hiring on our site:

For talented techies, creatives and professionals, Pittsburgh has jobs at the local offices of Google and Apple. It’s home to the headquarters of fashion retailers ModCloth and American Eagle.

Technology meets design meets user experience at home-grown hotties like art/tech/design/ad studio Deeplocal, award-winning translation app developer Duolingo, event-ticketing pioneer ShowClix and robotic stroller-maker to the stars 4Moms.

Wonksters thrive at global talent management consultancy DDI (Development Dimensions International), change-management company TiER1The Rand Corp. and offices of the major global management consultancies.

And these are just a few of what’s on offer. There are jobs for communicators at finance companies, for accountants at design firms, and for SAP specialists and other IT-focused positions virtually everywhere. Us, we’re partial to our Featured Employers, companies large and small who seriously care about building a talented workforce that will keeps Pittsbugh on this postive trajectory.

Click on ImaginePittsburgh.com, add us to your favorite read-it-later app and check us out early and often. We want you back!

 

Laura Fisher

This article first appeared in the May 8, 2015 edition of the Pittsburgh Business Times

“Could the next Brooklyn be Pittsburgh?” asks the headline of a recently published article in Brooklyn Based, a popular online magazine about all things Brooklyn. In the piece, the writer interviews seven former Brooklynites who flocked to Pittsburgh to seek out opportunity. She poses the obvious question: Why Pittsburgh?

This isn’t the first time that Pittsburgh has been compared to another hip, fast growing region in the country. It was only a few years ago that the Washington Post declared Pittsburgh “in” and Portland, Ore., “out.” And recently, Cleveland State University noted that Pittsburgh was best positioned to be “the next Boston.” Our region’s high quality of life, relatively low cost of living, and availability of jobs continues to attract national attention. Therefore, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that Brooklyn is taking notice.

bbFor the former Brooklynites interviewed, much of their initial reasoning for leaving New York City’s fastest growing borough had to do with cost of living. According to RealtyTrac, Brooklyn has the nation’s most unaffordable housing market when comparing median monthly household incomes to median housing prices. The same data firm also found Brooklyn is one of the least affordable areas for Millennials in the country. Compared to Pittsburgh, Brooklyn’s overall cost of living is almost twice as high.

Cost of living is important, but there are other reasons why Pittsburgh has become an attractive alternative. Our region was cited as having an abundance of economic opportunity, an educated population that is getting younger and is beginning to grow, and an authentic spirit of community and collaboration. Pittsburgh is a place where passionate, creative individuals can put down roots and feel a true sense of belonging. Opportunity is on the rise here.

This sense of real opportunity is already bringing in a population cohort that is increasingly important to our region’s future – Millennials. While it’s no secret that we have one of the nation’s oldest populations, our younger population is beginning to grow. Since 2010, Millennials have been our fastest growing age group. Between 2010 and 2013, the population of 25 to 34 year olds grew at a rate of 6.1 percent, more than twice the national rate of 2.8 percent. Conversely, the fastest growing age group nationally was 65 and over, which increased by 6.9 percent. Regionally that increase was just 2.3 percent.

Labor force participation by younger people in the region is also higher than the national average, with a 2.7 percent increase among 25 to 34 year olds compared with 0.4 percent nationally. Today, the median age in the City of Pittsburgh is 33.7, below the national average of 37.5.

These are positive trends, but as a community we have more work to do to meet the workforce demands of the future. Today our region’s working age population is home to many more people aged 45-65 than those aged 25-44 in line to replace them, a gap totaling 144,000. Despite recent positive trends (more people moving in than out and a fast-growing Latino population), our overall working age population is not growing fast enough to close this gap before the last of the Baby Boom generation leaves the workforce. There’s no silver bullet that will solve this problem. Rather, we need to be proactive in supporting a multi-pronged approach to attract, retain, educate and train more skilled workers.

The question, “Could the next Brooklyn be Pittsburgh?” is a bit misleading. Pittsburgh has its own unique community, culture and sense of place. It’s what makes us so special. It’s also what makes us attractive to those Brooklynites who are seeking a new place to call home. We must leverage our assets and work together to attract and welcome more talented individuals from Brooklyn and other regions across the country. Our region’s future depends on it.

speakers cropped
Covey’s Vanessa Jameson, Romeo Delivers’ Anne Lopez and Astrobotics’ John Thornton at the September 2014 ImaginePittsburgh.com + NEXTpgh event, What’s NEXT in Tech.

Join ImaginePittsburgh.com and NEXTpittsburgh on Tuesday, Feb. 24 for a networking happy hour and to hear from individuals who are innovating across communities to create a more welcoming, connected Pittsburgh. They include:

Debra Lam, chief innovation and performance officer for the City of Pittsburgh, a North Hills native who returned to Pittsburgh after working in New York, the United Kingdom, China, Taiwan and Hong Kong

Bill Generett, Jr., president/CEO of Urban Innovation21, which helps entrepreneurs in underserved communities participate in the region’s innovation economy

Jesabel Rivera, president of the Latin American Cultural Union, which works to better connect members of the region’s small-but-fast-growing Latino community to each other and the wider region

Diwas Timsina, founder of Children of Shangri-Lost, a youth-run nonprofit raising awareness of the Bhutanese community through short films and blog posts

Nathan Mallory, owner of Cannon Coffee in Brookline and president of the Brookline Chamber of Commerce

Doors open at 6 p.m.; panel begins at 6:30 p.m.; refreshments/networking at 7:30 p.m.

The event is free of charge but registration is required at bit.ly/Feb24event

Bonnie Pfister

The Pittsburgh region’s unique combination of geographic density, a deep pool of talent emerging from its universities and friendly people have made it an alternative to Silicon Valley for technology startups, The Atlantic recently reported.

Reporter John Tierney talks to Alpha Lab Gear’s Ilana Diamond, Innovation Works’ Rich Lunak and Andrew Moore, the new dean of Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Computer Science, to get details on how thePittsburgh region has become such fertile ground for new tech companies.

Read the full story here.

 

Brandon Mendoza

WattleyEarlier this year I had the opportunity to participate in Leadership Development Initiative XXI (LDI), a program of Leadership Pittsburgh Inc. Because of thisprogram I was able to work alongside 40 emerging leaders in the Pittsburgh region to plan Bright Night: A Larimer Light Festival.  And while learning leadership was the goal, the experience also provided the opportunity to explore Larimer, a great Pittsburgh neighborhood that like many other communities in our region, is currently reinventing itself and preparing for future prosperity.

Located in Pittsburgh’s East End, Larimer is bordered by Highland Park, East Liberty, Homewood, Shadyside, Point Breeze and Lincoln-Lemington-Belmar. The neighborhood recently was selected as a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Choice Neighborhood Initiative recipient, an award that will invest more than $30 million to revitalize the community. The investment will go towards high-quality mixed-income housing, improving educational/skills attainment, and creating an atmosphere for public and private partnerships. The funding will undoubtedly be a catalyst for additional public and private sector investment.

After DuskThroughout Larimer’s past struggles, its residents were the glue that kept the neighborhood together. It was the residents that galvanized support for the Larimer Plan and it is because of them that Larimer is positioned where it is today.  Furthermore, Larimer already has many existing assets that make it a special place – the Kingsley Association, the Larimer Consensus Group, the Larimer Village Green, the Environment and Energy Community Outreach Center – the changes in Larimer will no doubt be accelerated because of these assets. It is an exciting time to be in the Pittsburgh region, which received more than $2.4 billion in private sector investment last year, but for the region to continue to grow, places like Larimer must continue to revitalize themselves. Luckily, times are changing in Larimer and it is on the cusp of lasting change.

 

 

 

 

 

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Looking for a job? Pittsburgh’s got ‘em — more than 22,000 open positions across the 10-county region. Check out our powerful job search aggregator at ImaginePittsburgh.com/work.

Find a job, advance your career, build a life you’ll love: ImaginePittsburgh.com.

NEXTpittsburgh

Powered by NEXTpittsburgh.

Pittsburgh, skyline, three rivers, point, fountain
Photo Courtesy NEXTpittsburgh

Pittsburgh has done it again.

The Economist has ranked Pittsburgh as the most livable city in the continental United States, squeaking in just under Honolulu.

Not bad, considering Hawaii is a vacation destination.

This marks the second time that the esteemed journal of global economies has ranked Pittsburgh at or near the top. The Economist first designated Pittsburgh as the most livable city in America in 2009. But you won’t find it online.

The news is buried in a report issued by The Economist Intelligence Unit that was the basis for the article–more of a graphic image really–reported in The Economist of the top worldwide cities. Melbourne tops the list, followed by Vienna, Vancover and Toronto. Pittsburgh ranked No. 30 out of 140 cities surveyed.

VisitPITTSBURGH uncovered the info and sent out a news release earlier today and, at our request, sent the actual report including a full listing of rankings for Pittsburgh.

“Pittsburgh has the goods,” said Craig Davis, president and CEO of VisitPITTSBURGH. “We have received so much buzz in the last 10 years and it has helped us tremendously. This kind of success begets more success. We’re riding a wave.”

The Economist defines the concept of livability as a “simple assessment” that determines “locations around the world (that) provide the best or the worst living conditions.”

The study notes that those cities scoring best “tend to be mid-sized cities in wealthier countries with a relatively low population density. This can foster a range of recreational activities without leading to high crime levels or overburdened infrastructure.”

Here’s how Pittsburgh ranked in the following categories on a scale of 1-100, with 100 being considered “ideal”: stability rating 85; healthcare 92; culture and environment 91; education 100; and infrastructure 100.

Pittsburgh was four points behind Honolulu and ahead of Washington, D.C., Chicago and Atlanta and the rest of America.

While The Economist rankings definitely have “street cred,” it was the Places Rated Almanac that really put Pittsburgh on the map in 2007, says Craig.

Since 2000, Pittsburgh has made more than 200 “best” lists including “40 Prettiest Cities in the World” (Huffington Post), “Most Entrepreneurial City in the America (Inc.), “Most Livable City in America” (Forbes) and “Best Places in the World to Visit in 2012″ (National Geographic Traveler).

Pittsburgh is the only city in the country that has been twice named to Places Rated Almanac.

 

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Looking for a job? Pittsburgh’s got ‘em — more than 22,000 open positions across the 10-county region. Check out our powerful job search aggregator at ImaginePittsburgh.com/work.

Find a job, advance your career, build a life you’ll love: ImaginePittsburgh.com.