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Powered by NEXTpittsburgh |  Michael Machosky

So, Fences is up for a lot of Academy Awards this year. It was mostly made in the same neighborhood where playwright August Wilson imagined itwith Denzel Washington’s Troy Maxson roaring across the Hill District of the ’50s like the literal wrecking ball that would smash through the neighborhood soon thereafter.

It’s both one of the best movies ever made in Pittsburgh, and one of the most Pittsburgh movies ever made. Those are two completely different things, of course.

For sheer Pittsburgh content (regardless of quality), it’s kind of hard to top Sudden Death (1995), which features a fight scene between Jean-Claude Van Damme and Iceburgh (the Penguins mascot) in the kitchen of the Civic Arena, using a deli meat slicer and a deep fryer as weapons. Flashdance (1983) is another Pittsburgh classicabout a steelworker/stripper (!), in a time-capsule-of-the-’80s sense. It was a massive hit, even though the critics hated it.

Picking the best movies made in Pittsburgh, though, is actually really tough. Even five years ago, it was easier. But the recent boom in Pittsburgh-made productions has knocked out some good-but-not-great movies, like Wonder Boys (2000), of the top 10.

As always, feel free to disagree, and add your own picks below. I feel like I’m going to change my mind already.

Tom Hardy in "The Dark Knight Rises" (2012).
Tom Hardy in “The Dark Knight Rises” (2012). Warner Bros. Entertainment, Inc. and Legendary Pictures Funding, LLC.

Tom Hardy in “The Dark Knight Rises” (2012). Warner Bros. Entertainment, Inc. and Legendary Pictures Funding, LLC.

10). The Dark Knight Rises (2012) is certainly the biggest movie ever made in Pittsburgh, making more than a billion dollars worldwide. Compared to the first two chapters in Christopher Nolan’s Dark Knight (Batman) trilogy, it’s a lugubrious, murky slog, with the franchise’s least interesting villain (Tom Hardy tried, but it’s hard to act with your mouth covered). Still, there are a few action sequences here that are simply stunning, such as the apocalyptic destruction of Heinz Field on game day. And by this point, the onrushing doom of Nolan’s vision has its own unstoppable momentum.

9.) Lightning Over Braddock: A Rustbowl Fantasy (1988): There’s always been a strong undercurrent of experimental cinema in Pittsburgh, going back to the ‘60s. To single out one superb example, there’s Tony Buba’s sublimely weird Lightning Over Braddock. It’s about both the economic implosion of a working class steel town paradise, and some goofball local character named Sal, who periodically hijacks the whole movie, steering it towards his own esoteric, self-aggrandizing ends. You’ll never see another movie like it.

8.) The Perks of Being a Wallflower (2012): In the social hierarchy of high school, being a wallflowerthe shy, observant sortis only slightly above hall monitors and kids crammed into lockers. But for freshman Charlie (Logan Lerman), there are some perks, like being adopted by an older clique of worldly misfits, including a girl who was a wizard in a past life (Emma Watson). Somehow, of the three great coming-of-age novels of Pittsburgh adolescence, the best book, Michael Chabon’s The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, made the worst movie. The second best book, Jesse Andrews’ brilliant and underrated Me and Earl and the Dying Girl, made a very good movie (just missing this list). However, Stephen Chbosky’s Perks takes the crown, through outstanding performances from its leads.

"Dawn of the Dead" (1978).
Ken Foree in “Dawn of the Dead” (1978). The MKR Group, Inc.

Ken Foree in “Dawn of the Dead” (1978). The MKR Group, Inc.

7.) Dawn of the Dead (1978): The legendary first sequel to Night of the Living Dead has some surprisingly sharp satire of modern consumer culture buried beneath the endless severed limbs and decapitated heads. A few lonely survivors try to ride out the apocalypse holed up in Monroeville Mall, while the undead return to wander endlessly, aimlesslynot that much differently than when they were alive, actually. Who knew the world would end not with a bang or a whimper, but with an all-you-can-eat buffet (of humans) at the mall?

Tim Robbins and Giancarlo Esposito in "Bob Roberts" (1992).
Tim Robbins and Giancarlo Esposito in “Bob Roberts” (1992).

Tim Robbins and Giancarlo Esposito in “Bob Roberts” (1992).

6.) Bob Roberts (1992): Though obviously intended as political satire, it now hits a bit too close to homelike some sort of demonic prophecy foretold. Actor/writer/director Tim Robbins plays a genial folk-singing fascist, an entertainer who makes the jump to a Pennsylvania Senate race by preying on the fears and worst instincts of the marginal and the gullible. He cleverly inverts Bob Dylanesque protest songs into anthems about lynching drug dealers (and users), and the lazy immigrants and welfare queens living large on your unwitting largesse: “Times are Changin’ Back,” “Retake America,” “My Land.” It’s funny and ridiculous until, suddenly, it’s not. Still probably less absurd than our current political reality.

5.) Fences (2016): It’s impossible to know how this will age, or how it will relate to the rest if Denzel Washington adapts all 10 of August Wilson’s Pittsburgh Cycle plays for the screen. At times, Fences feels more like a play than a movie, but that’s really the only criticism that sticks. By now, the role fits Washington like an old catcher’s mitt. He and Viola Davis reprise the roles that won them Tonys on Broadway, wearing the pain and sorrow and fleeting bits of joy of their fenced-in characters as if August Wilson is still watching.

"Slap Shot" (1977).
Paul Newman in “Slap Shot” (1977). Universal Pictures.

Paul Newman in “Slap Shot” (1977). Universal Pictures.

4.) Slap Shot (1977). Another genre that rarely gets respect is the sports movie. Slap Shot (shot in Johnstown, Pittsburgh and upstate New York),  might be the funniest and best movie about sports ever made. It’s a rite of passage for hockey fans, and explains the pugnacious, blue-collar soul of the sport like nothing else. Though it’s easy to miss amidst all the blood and unbelievably crude jokes, there’s also an undercurrent of foreboding hereadroitly depicting a looming crisis of masculinity, when the mills and factories are shutting down, and people are clinging to any bit of hope and camaraderie they can find.

3.) The Deer Hunter (1978): This film is a panoramic portrait of mill town martyrdom, as souls forged in the steel mills of Western Pennsylvania are fed into the final furnace of Vietnam. Robert DeNiro, Christopher Walken and Meryl Streep all appear at the peaks of their respective powers. From the wild Russian Orthodox wedding to the prison camp game of Russian roulette, this is the sort of cinematic moonshot that either launches or detonates careers. For Michael Cimino, it was the former, until its catastrophic follow-up, Heaven’s Gate (1980), became the latter.

2.) The Silence of the Lambs (1991): Serial killers have kind of been done to death (sorry), but it’s hard to overstate how unsettling and original this seemed back in 1991. It won Academy Awards in the Big 5 categories: Best Picture, Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Director and Adapted Screenplay, which never happens, and horror movies rarely get nominated for anything in the first place. Also, the house in Fayette County (which is pretty nice!) where the killer, uh, did bad stuff, took forever to sell, because . . . well, we don’t really know. But go ahead, you try to live there.

"Night of the Living Dead" (1968).
Judith O’Dea in “Night of the Living Dead” (1968).

Judith O’Dea in “Night of the Living Dead” (1968).

1.) Night of the Living Dead (1968): In town for the Pittsburgh premiere of Land of the Dead in 2005, filmmaker Quentin Tarantino mentioned that the American independent movie was born in Pittsburgh with George Romero’s Night of the Living Dead. Romero (who previously worked on Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood), along with some friends, family and friends-of-friends, didn’t realize they were inventing the modern horror movie or a zombie genre that still refuses to die. The claustrophobic, walls-closing-in sets, shadowy black & white film, and tense, wartime newsreel-like cinematography weren’t selected to maximize terrorthey were just cheap. The guts and innards yanked from screaming victims weren’t elaborate special effectsthey were pieces of meat the butcher shop didn’t want. Duane Jones wasn’t intended to break new ground for African-American actorshe just gave the best audition. In 1999, the movie was selected for preservation in the National Film Registry at the Library of Congress.

Got a favorite movie made in Pittsburgh that we didn’t mention? Here’s your chance in the comments below.

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NEXTpittsburgh

Powered by NEXTpittsburgh | Jennifer Baron

The shortest month of the year is not short on things to do—in fact we had trouble narrowing it down to 11. Resist the urge to hibernate with tropical vibes, warming whiskeys, fantastical fashion and much more.

 Phipps
Courtesy Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens.

1. Party in the Tropics at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens: February 3, 7—11 p.m.

Dance away the winter blues amidst lush greenery, rushing waterfalls, rare orchids and tropical cocktails. No you haven’t won an island getaway. Botany buffs and night owls will converge when Phipps delivers a dose of revelry amidst the winter gloom. The conservatory will morph into one of Pittsburgh’s most unique nightlife spots populated by dazzling displays of flora—from massive sausage trees to colorful Napoleon hat plants. Visitors can wander outdoors into the mesmerizing Winter Light Garden, which has been extended through February 10th. Bigger than ever, the enchanting exhibit sparkles with luminous orbs, trees and fountains, and a new immersive tunnel of lights that mimics the twinkling, nighttime winter sky. Party In The Tropics will also feature music by DJ Mike Ley, hands-on activities and savory bites and seasonal cocktails for sale at Café Phipps.

 

Iris van Herpen
Iris van Herpen, Refinery Smoke, Dress, 2008. Photo: Bart Oomes, No 6 Studios.

2. Iris van Herpen: Transforming Fashion at Carnegie Museum of Art: February 4–May 1

She’s dressed Beyonce, Bjork, and Lady Gaga, collaborated with starchitect Rem Koolhaas, and was the first to use 3D printing in fashion. Pittsburghers will now have the rare chance to experience the extraordinary designs of Dutch international fashion sensation Iris van Herpen up close and off the runway. With intriguing monikers like Hacking Infinity, Wilderness Embodied and Biopiracy, van Herpen’s innovative collections reflect her interest in blending art, science, technology and nature. Under van Herpen’s masterful vision, fashion is transformed into fantastical worlds and living sculptures—from a dress made from woven metal gauze that mimics billowing smoke to architectural high-heeled shoes fabricated from a 3D printer. Fusing haute couture handicraft with cutting-edge technology, van Herpen works with a dazzling array of unexpected materials, such as crystals, glass bubbles and umbrella tines. Inspired by neuroscience, science fiction and the environment, van Herpen’s work is designed to move and change along with the human body. The results are otherworldly fashions you have to see to believe.

WYEP
Courtesy WYEP.

3. Alternative Souper Bowl Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh: February 5

Carnegie Library’s Quiet Reading Room is about to bring on the noise. Whether you have your money on the Falcons or Patriots, don’t miss the chance to celebrate the local music scene and help end homelessness at WYEP’s 18th annual Alternative Souper Bowl. Tap your foot to the old-timey vibes of bluegrass, country and rockabilly band The Jakob’s Ferry Stragglers, be lulled by the melodies of singer-songwriter Brooke Annibale and groove to the retro sounds of The Buckle Downs. Don’t forget to bring a non-perishable food or household item to help stock the shelves at HEARTH, a local shelter for homeless and displaced women and their children. Free and open to all ages from noon to 3 p.m., the Souper Bowl will be emceed by WYEP’s Morning Mix host Cindy Howes and will be broadcast live on 91.3 FM.

Shower Curtain Art project by Mike Cuccaro. January 22: Hippo on some painted dots.
Shower Curtain Art project by Mike Cuccaro. January 22: Hippo on some painted dots.

4. Fun-A-Day at TechShop Pittsburgh: February 4 & 5

For many people it’s yoga, for others it’s journaling, and for others it’s walking 2,000 steps. Daily rituals are a powerful and centering part of life. This month you can meet local makers who took up the creative clarion call—and check out more than 50 projects made throughout January—at the two-day Fun-A-Day exhibition. From an effort to turn junk mail into art, to a “Trump outrage calendar,” impassioned projects encompass a staggering array of mediums and techniques. See how Pittsburgh’s industrious doers are infusing daily life with art to foster creative expression and let off steam. Always inclusive and un-juried, the grassroots phenomenon has showcased tens of thousands of projects around the globe. Free to all ages, the opening reception runs from 5 to 7 p.m. on February 4th. Follow along here.

Wigle Whiskey
Courtesy Wigle Whiskey.

5. Valentine’s Day and Ginger Whiskey Weekend at Wigle Whiskey: February 14, 17, 18, 19

Chocolate and roses make a great duo, but pairing chocolate and whiskey is even better. On Valentine’s Day, get a first taste of Wigle’s new batch of Afterglow Ginger Whiskey, sample chocolate and whiskey pairing flights and sip cocktails at Wigle’s Strip District HQ. Cupid’s devotees can learn about Wigle’s award-winning production facilities during “Sweetheart Distillery Tours.” Then head back on February 17-19 for a three-day celebration of sweet and spicy Pennsylvania exoticism. Friday’s Spicy Soirée release party will showcase Wigle’s Afterglow, a spicy and sweet spirit made from pot-distilled whiskey and ginger cultivated at Chatham’s Eden Hall campus. The weekend will feature all things ginger: Imperial Ginger Beer from Southern Tier, Ginger Whiskey cocktails, and ginger-infused tacos, plus live music by Greg Jones, whiskey truffles from Mon Aimee Chocolat and bites from the Pittsburgh Sandwich Society. Buy tickets.

6. Firelei Báez: Bloodlines at The Andy Warhol Museum: February 17–May 21

Visitors to The Warhol will be the first to see select works by an important contemporary artist that have never before exhibited in a museum. Exploring gender, race, identity politics and the history of social movements in the U.S. and Caribbean, Bloodlines presents a comprehensive look at the large-scale art of Firelei Báez, who was born in the Dominican Republic. Featuring 15 works, the thoughtful exhibit showcases her labor intensive, textured and colorful artistic process. Richly layered works depict textiles, hair designs and body ornaments that explore Caribbean history and folklore from female viewpoints. Female figures are painted with elaborate tignons, or 18th-century headdresses imposed by law for women of color in New Orleans—a form of oppression that became a symbol of power and beauty. Also featured are Azabache gemstones carved into fists and worn in Latin American cultures as protection from evil spirits and panthers—a symbol claimed by the 1960s Black Panther party. Báez will also collaborate with local students to create site-specific wall paintings. A powerful voice on the contemporary art scene, Báez challenges viewers to confront critical social issues that are often ignored in mainstream culture.

Duane Michals
A Last Walk in the Woods, Duane Michals.

7. Duane Michals at Point Park University: February 18, 7 p.m.

Recently showcased in a first-of-its-kind retrospective at Carnegie Museum of Art—which was lauded by everyone from The New York Times to Artforum—groundbreaking photographer and McKeesport native Duane Michals will debut his latest body of work during this unique artist talk and film screening. Co-presented by Silver Eye Center for Photography and Point Park University, the event should not be missed by any fan of contemporary art. Be among the first to see Michals’ newest project, Talking Pictures, which includes 12 short films written, directed—and at times acted in—by the artist. Exploring themes running throughout his prolific career such as identity, homosexuality and counterculture, Talking Pictures reflects Michals’ passion for the history of filmmaking—from the golden age of Hollywood to experimental cinema. Talking Pictures draws inspiration from a wide range of cinematic styles and sources including film pioneers like Charlie Chaplin, Georges Méliès and Kenneth Anger. A highly influential and pivotal figure in 20th-century art, Michaels is acclaimed for his innovative process that uses photographic sequences, multiple exposures, handwritten texts, and manipulated imagery. Register now.

Lunar Gala
Lunar Gala. Photo by Chloe Chia.

8. Lunar Gala at Carnegie Mellon University: February 18

The countdown to this year’s Lunar Gala is on, and across campus and the city, student designers, models, dancers, videographers and technicians are finalizing their vision for one of Pittsburgh’s largest fashion events. To produce the showcase, students across all disciplines have created original lines that fuse complex materials, wearable fashions, innovative technologies and interdisciplinary cultural themes. Be the first to see 150 fresh looks created by 17 design teams presented alongside performances by Infra Dance Company and Soulstylz. From zip ties and sheet metal to mood-sensing Intel chips, the forward-thinking designs reflect today’s society, technology and current events. For the first time, the haute happening will feature an Alumni Line showcasing fashions from across the U.S., as well as Japanese-inspired designs by NYC’s own up-and-coming streetwear brand Ronin Division. Attendees will also ring in the Chinese New Year with a new theme inspired by the lunar calendar’s Zodiac animal. The Lunar Gala fashion show starts at 8 p.m. at CMU’s Jared L. Cohon University Center. Tickets go on sale Feb. 6th.

Beerfest
Courtesy Pittsburgh Winter Beerfest.

9. Pittsburgh Winter Beerfest at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center: February 24 & 25

It’s a good thing that Dry January is over, because the fourth annual Pittsburgh Winter Beerfest—one of the top 10 biggest craft beer festivals in the country—is back and bigger than ever. That means 225,000 square feet of space flowing with 400 varieties of refreshing craft beers from 125 breweries. From Session IPA, cider and barrel-aged stout, to gose, honey lager and hefeweizen—there’s a brew for all styles and palates. The staggering—and growing—roster of featured brewers includes everyone from San Diego’s Ballast Point and Boulder’s New Planet to Pittsburgh’s own East End Brewing. Showcasing craft beer from just down the street, coast-to-coast and even around the globe, the event will also feature live music, local eats, souvenir mugs and a VIP Connoisseurs Reception. Newly added is a daytime session on Saturday. Pairing craft libations with doing good, this year’s festival is donating proceeds to the local nonprofit Animal Rescue Partners. Buy tickets.

Q Ball
Q Ball. Photo by Mark Simpson.

10. The Q Ball at the Union Trust Building: February 25

Whether in art history class or at museums, you’ve likely seen the dreamlike images—often of long-locked women in natural settings—conjured by English painters like William Holman Hunt, John Everett Millais and Dante Gabriel Rossetti. At “Painting With Light,” Quantum Theatre invites you to step into the frame and play the part of Pre-Raphaelite muse. Downtown’s ornate Gilded Age landmark will provide an ideal setting for the cutting-edge company’s signature benefit bash. Transforming the iconic 11-story Union Trust Building into an interactive tableaux of 19th-century masterworks, the Q Ball will blend the great cultural traditions of theatre, painting and literature with revelry and dramatic photo opps. Translation: Dress like you’re posing for pioneering 19th-century portrait photographer Julia Margaret Cameron. From 7 to 9 p.m., VIPers will enjoy fab fare catered by chef Kate Romane’s new Black Radish Kitchen, live entertainment and commemorative photos. The fantasia gets groovy at 9 p.m. with tasty desserts and a Digital Dance Party curated by DJ Soy Sos. Buy tickets.

Pittsburgh Film Office
Photo: Leeann Marie. Courtesy Pittsburgh Film Office.

11. Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield Presents “Lights! Glamour! Action! at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center: February 26, 6 p.m.

And the Oscar goes to . . . YOU. Well, at least for one February night when the Pittsburgh Film Office unrolls all 500 feet of the city’s longest red carpet for its signature benefit bash. Whether you’re team Emma, Denzel or Ryan, you can cheer on this year’s nominees and turn on that Tinsel Town panache all without having to trek 2,500 miles to La La Land. Get glammed up and strike a pose to celebrate and support Hollywood East—where television shows like MindhunterOutsiders and Downward Dog and films like Fences and Last Flag Flying have recently filmed on home turf. Watch the drama of the 89th Academy Awards unfold live on a massive broadcast screen and vie for cool stuff in the 50/50 raffle. While rubbing elbows with local celebs, entertainment insiders, business leaders and politicians, gala-goers will be treated to live music by Totally 80s, gourmet food stations and premium cocktails. Proceeds will benefit the PFO, which has assisted with 138-plus productions and generated $1.2 billion in regional economic impact since 1990. Buy tickets.

Pittsburgh Cultural Trust
Courtesy Pittsburgh Cultural Trust.

Check out more events every week in NEXTpittsburgh, including these coming up in February:

Fiesta Fiesta dance party at the Kelly Strayhorn Theater: February 3
Attack Theatre’s One Night Stand at Ace Hotel Pittsburgh: February 11
The Warhol Museum’s Vintage Valentines Workshop at Ace Hotel Pittsburgh: February 12
The Book of Mormon at the Benedum Center: February 21—26
Gregory Porter at the August Wilson Center: February 22
Black Bottom Film Festival at the August Wilson Center: February 24—26
Showcase Noir Art Show and Sale at the August Wilson Center: February 24—26

Looking for events for families and children? Check out our Top 10 family events in Pittsburgh this January feature story.

Looking for live music? Check out our 17 can’t-miss Pittsburgh concerts in 2017 feature story.

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Looking for a job? ImaginePittsburgh.com‘s got ‘em — more than 20,000 open positions on our powerful, 10-county job search aggregator, updated nightly.

Find a job, advance your career, build a life you’ll love: ImaginePittsburgh.com.

- See more at: http://explore.imaginepittsburgh.com/now/nextpgh-restaurants4visitors/32987/#sthash.FguYYqqy.dpuf

Fitt PGH

Powered by Fitt Pittsburgh / Joe Vennare

’Tis the season for holiday parties, overeating, and hiding indoors until spring arrives.

Facts are facts, gang. Staying active when the snow starts to fall is pretty much impossible. At least that’s what we tell ourselves. Fortunately, Pittsburgh’s events calendar is out to prove us all wrong.

From festive fun runs to yoga and booze, here are the December events making it a whole lot easier to find some balance and break a sweat while celebrating the holiday season.

Lights Off, Breath On

pittsburghyogaflowINFOGrab your mat and head to Yoga Flow in Mt. Lebanon for this glowga class. In case it didn’t click, “glowga” is glow in the dark yoga (clever). Dress in white, get done up with some body paint, and wear neon bracelets to enhance the effect of the black lights in the studio. Once you’re all painted up, get ready to take your Vinyasa practice to the next level as you breathe, flow, and glow. Extra points if you draw on glow-in-the-dark Warrior (pose) face paint. December 3

Polar Plunge

pittsburghpolarplungeINFOReady to rock your bathing suit (or a Speedo!?) in December? Yes, it seems kinda nuts. But it’s not as crazy when you’re freezing for a reason. And that’s exactly what the Polar Plunge is all about. You and a few thousand friends strip down to your skivvies before jumping into the chilly Ohio River. It will be a good time for a great cause, supporting the Special Olympics and athletes in Pennsylvania. December 10

Jingle Bell Run

pittsburghjinglebellrunINFOBust out your best Santa outfit, elf attire, or reindeer costume and get to the North Shore for one of Pittsburgh’s essential races. The Jingle Bell Run is a holiday tradition around these parts. This 5k race is your chance to sweat and celebrate while raising funds to help cure arthritis. How festive is it? Well, you’ll be happy to know that prizes go out to the best costumes for both people AND dogs. So round up your friends, get decked out from head to mistletoe, and jingle all the way to the finish line. December 3

Holiday Lights Run

PPG WinterGarden Lights Run
image via Dave Dicello

INFO

Join the crew from Fleet Feet for a run through the 412, exploring all of the holiday decorations along the way. This run kicks off in Market Square, departing from PPG Place, before hitting every must-see festive display downtown. With a six- and four-mile option, plus a one-mile Holiday Stroll, there’s something for every runner (or walker). Wear your blinking bulbs, festive socks and holiday best (layers, people) for a good time that benefits the UPMC Children’s Hospital Free Care Fund. December 15

Winter Solstice Stroll

pittsburghhartwoodINFOPittsburgh is an awesome city for exploring the great outdoors – though, you may have already known that. From hiking to rock climbing and kayaking to camping, there are endless adventures to be had. And Venture Outdoors makes getting outside easy, even in the winter. Join the VO crew for a four-mile evening hike around Hartwood Acres on the shortest day of the year. And if you love the cosmos (not talking about the drink), it’s the perfect stargazing stroll. December 21

Bend, Brews, and Brunch @ Spoonwood

sarahlishy
image via @sarahlishy

INFO

Sweat, sip, and snack your way through a Sunday morning yoga, brunch, and beer sesh at Spoonwood Brewing in Bethel Park. Yes, this is, in fact, all of our favorite things rolled into one. Join Annie Federoff & Kiersten O’Halek of Pure Power Yoga for a 75-minute Vinyasa flow followed by your choice of three brunch options and a beer flight tasting of three beers. Count us in! December 11

Happy Hour Run

True Runner
image via True Runner Facebook

INFO

Getting motivated to go for a run is hard enough. Going for a run outside, in December, when it’s cold and dark at 5 o’clock is the absolute worst. Unless, of course, you’re running with a bunch of fit friends before grabbing a beer. Sound like something you might be into? Well then, meet up at True Runner in Shadyside for a run around the neighborhood followed by beers a Mario’s. Bonus: It’s on the shortest day of the year…so you’ll likely spend more time beering than running. December 21

Holiday Sparkle @ SHPY


image via South Hills Power Yoga Facebook

INFO

Our friends at South Hills Power Yoga are celebrating the holiday season by giving the gift of free yoga. Just show up for a 90-minute power yoga session on the house. We know what you’re thinking, it doesn’t get much better than that. Oh, but it does! Because they’ll also have a little community social afterward, complete with sparkling wine and cookies. Thanks, SHPY! December 16

Ice Skating @ PPG Place

image via Stephanie Strasburg
image via Stephanie Strasburg

INFO

Bundle up, lace up your skates, and glide around the new and improved ice skating rink at PPG Place. The rink is bigger than ever before, accommodating more than 300 skaters at once! It’s the perfect way to stay active during the winter months (and not a bad winter date idea).

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Looking for a job? ImaginePittsburgh.com‘s got ‘em — more than 20,000 open positions on our powerful, 10-county job search aggregator, updated nightly.

Find a job, advance your career, build a life you’ll love: ImaginePittsburgh.com.

- See more at: http://explore.imaginepittsburgh.com/now/#sthash.ZldgUOfC.dpuf

Bonnie Pfister

ServiceToOpportunity.org is a powerful matching tool that connects veterans directly to managers ready to hire for in-demand jobs at regional energy and manufacturing companies. The site has recently been enhanced with a fresh, more user-friendly interface, videos of the types of open jobs, and a direct and personal connection to employers.

If you’ve already created a job seeker profile on the site, click here to reset your password (as part of the site revamp) to begin connecting with employers ready to hire. Not sure if you made a profile? Enter your email address in the log in page; if you’ve already created a profile, you will be prompted to update your password. If you haven’t, or if your new to the site, it takes about five minutes to create a basic profile; you can always come back later to tell employers more about your skills and experience.

VETERANS: Even if you’re not job-hunting right now, it’s always a good career move to have your resume out in places where recruiters are looking for talented, hardworking veterans. Sign up here, or pass the word to veterans or returning servicemen or women in your personal and professional networks, on Service To Opportunity®’s social media platforms: Facebook.com/ServiceToOpportunity and Twitter.com/Srv2Opportunity.

EMPLOYERS: Want to post your Pittsburgh region energy or manufacturing jobs on ServiceToOpportunity.org? Contact kmckenzie@alleghenyconference.org.

Out of the way, San Jose! Pittsburgh is No.1 in mulitple realms, as the world is hearing on a nearly weekly basis.

Pittsburgh is increasingly a destination of choice for people looking to advance their careers — in tech and otherwise — and build a great life in a hip, affordable region.

Trulia  + LinkedIn’s new Graduate Opportunity Index touts the region for its affordability and wealth of entry-level jobs and educated Millennials. Sales industry intelligence platform DataFox calls Pittsburgh one of the country’s top cities for startups, with an “ecosystem – anchored by its prestigious colleges and universities – helping to prove the city’s upper hand and competitive advantage to most Silicon Valley/New York-esque, fast-moving, consumer-focused entrepreneurial cities.” Plus our restaurant scene is awesome.

Cool jobs. Hot industries. Affordability. And more than 20,000 jobs open today across southwestern PA. You can explore them all here at ImaginePittsburgh.com, the region’s digital hub for information about hot careers, industries and employers.