ImaginePittsburgh.com

STEM education is not just for city kids anymore.

A permanent workshop, known as a “Fab Lab,” will be located in Grindstone, Fayette County, while a second, mobile Fab Lab will travel to other rural school districts in area governed by regional education agency Intermediate Unit 1 (IU1). The labs will provide high-tech equipment and teacher resources that are not often available in rural parts of these counties.

“At Chevron, we understand STEM education is important to a successful future for our local communities. We are working with our partners to provide access to state-of-the-art education and technology resources to equip students with the critical skills needed to fill the jobs of tomorrow, particularly for those with limited access to the tools necessary for success in these fields,” said Nigel Hearne, vice president of Chevron Appalachia Michigan Business Unit based in the Pittsburgh area.

The IU1 Community Fab Lab will provide access to resources for the students in the K-12 system, undergraduate students and the community at-large, including skilled staff and volunteers, design and fabrication equipment and access to an international Fab Lab network. It will ultimately touch an estimated 56,000 people. Founded in 2009 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, The Fab Foundation brings digital fabrication tools and processes to people of all ages, developing educational and offering professional development training programs for teachers.

The hands-on learning that will be available at IU1 Fab Lab aims to spark interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) and prepare individuals for the nearly 1 million U.S. jobs that will require basic STEM literacy over the next five years – including more than 2,000 energy and manufacturing jobs southwestern Pennsylvania.

“This Fab Lab is a tremendous resource for teachers and students throughout southwestern Pennsylvania,” said Fayette County Commissioner Al Ambrosini. “It will help get our kids excited about science and give them the technical skills they will need in their careers. I commend Chevron for its commitment to our community and to educating our children.”

The IU1 Community Fab Lab will feature such state-of-the-art design and fabrication equipment as laser cutters, 3D printers, vinyl cutters and milling machines. The Fab Lab will promote innovation and design in the community and will build the local workforce capacity.

This digital fabrication workshop is made possible through a $1.2 million contribution by Chevron. It is part of the company’s $10 million commitment to the Fab Foundation to build Fab Labs in areas where it operates in the United States. This Fab Lab is a component of the Appalachia Partnership Initiative, a collaborative effort formed by Chevron to develop a highly-skilled regional workforce.

“Intermediate Unit 1 is proud to be one of the few organizations selected from around the world to receive both a mobile and a stationary community Fab Lab,” said Charles F. Mahoney, Intermediate Unit 1 executive director.

“We will continue to be an innovative educational keystone transforming education and learning for the countless students, educators and community members we serve.”

STEM education is not just for city kids anymore.

Thanks to a collaboration by Chevron, the nonprofit Fab Foundation and regional schools, digital fabrication workshops are coming to Fayette, Green and Washington counties.

A permanent workshop, known as a “Fab Lab,” will be located in Grindstone, Fayette County, while a second, mobile Fab Lab will travel to other rural school districts in area governed by regional education agency Intermediate Unit 1 (IU1). The labs will provide high-tech equipment and teacher resources that are not often available in rural parts of these counties.

fabLabOriginalrotatorIP“At Chevron, we understand STEM education is important to a successful future for our local communities. We are working with our partners to provide access to state-of-the-art education and technology resources to equip students with the critical skills needed to fill the jobs of tomorrow, particularly for those with limited access to the tools necessary for success in these fields,” said Nigel Hearne, vice president of Chevron Appalachia Michigan Business Unit based in the Pittsburgh area.

The IU1 Community Fab Lab will provide access to resources for the students in the K-12 system, undergraduate students and the community at-large, including skilled staff and volunteers, design and fabrication equipment and access to an international Fab Lab network. It will ultimately touch an estimated 56,000 people. Founded in 2009 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, The Fab Foundation brings digital fabrication tools and processes to people of all ages, developing educational and offering professional development training programs for teachers.

The hands-on learning that will be available at IU1 Fab Lab aims to spark interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) and prepare individuals for the nearly 1 million U.S. jobs that will require basic STEM literacy over the next five years – including more than 2,000 energy and manufacturing jobs southwestern Pennsylvania.

“This Fab Lab is a tremendous resource for teachers and students throughout southwestern Pennsylvania,” said Fayette County Commissioner Al Ambrosini. “It will help get our kids excited about science and give them the technical skills they will need in their careers. I commend Chevron for its commitment to our community and to educating our children.”

The IU1 Community Fab Lab will feature such state-of-the-art design and fabrication equipment as laser cutters, 3D printers, vinyl cutters and milling machines. The Fab Lab will promote innovation and design in the community and will build the local workforce capacity.

This digital fabrication workshop is made possible through a $1.2 million contribution by Chevron. It is part of the company’s $10 million commitment to the Fab Foundation to build Fab Labs in areas where it operates in the United States. This Fab Lab is a component of the Appalachia Partnership Initiative, a collaborative effort formed by Chevron to develop a highly-skilled regional workforce.

“Intermediate Unit 1 is proud to be one of the few organizations selected from around the world to receive both a mobile and a stationary community Fab Lab,” said Charles F. Mahoney, Intermediate Unit 1 executive director.
“We will continue to be an innovative educational keystone transforming education and learning for the countless students, educators and community members we serve.”

NEXTpittsburgh

Powered by NEXTpittsburgh |   Tom O’Connor

Late-night menus are making midnight food adventures in Pittsburgh more interesting. When late-night cravings hit, it’s nice to have fresh options to go along with the all-night diners, pizza joints and food trucks. And it’s safe to say that food tastes pretty fantastic when you’ve been fueling up on beers and cocktails all evening, or just wrapping up a busy work week. But when you find that perfect “still open” spot to match your mood, it’s magical.

Ready for a little late-night culinary exploring? Here are a few places to add to your map along with some of the midnight classics:

Robatayaki at Umami. Photo by Tom O'Connor.
Robatayaki at Umami. Photo by Tom O’Connor.

Umami – Lawrenceville

Umami feels like the perfect late-night destination. The red lanterns give off a comfortable glow and the vibe feels relaxed with just enough “night market” energy to keep the fun going.

There’s a lot to choose from here: platters of colorful sushi and sashimi, temaki sushi rolled into handheld cones, rice bowls and ramen, gyozas and shumai all bursting with flavor.

The tantalizing smells of the robatayaki grill are immediately mouthwatering. This Japanese barbecue-like method involves small skewers of meat or vegetables slow-grilled over hot charcoal. The point is not to flame up and scorch the food, but to slow grill everything to its sweet spot, where juices start to flow. Beef and chicken take on smoky flavors and a crunchy outside while the inside is melt-in-your-mouth tender.

The robust cold sake menu offers many different flavor profiles to experience. The cocktail list is peppered with Japanese-leaning elements like flavored shochus (Japanese distilled beverages), ginger, coconut, wasabi and matcha. There’s also a full wine list and a great selection of Japanese beers that pair perfectly with bold flavors.

Our pick: The Wagyu beef tenderloin and pork belly from the robotayaki menu.

Location: 202 38th St., Lawrenceville (above Round Corner Cantina). Open: Tuesday – Thursday 4:30 p.m. – 12 a.m., Friday – Saturday 4:30 p.m. – 2 a.m.

Seafood Wontons and "Moon" Sauce at Cambo-dican. Photo by Tom O'Connor.
Seafood Wontons and “Moon” Sauce at Cambod-ican. Photo by Tom O’Connor.

Cambod-ican Kitchen – The South Side

People light up when you mention the name—“Oh, Cambod-ican! Love that place!” Mentioning it often leads to flashbacks of post-bar adventures and crazy nights: late-night munchies at the famous food cart that eventually morphed into a real restaurant on the South Side. Cambod-ican Kitchen is now an after-hours staple in the neighborhood.

Cambodian and Asian fusion cuisine, with all kinds of noodle dishes, curries, wontons and kabobs, is a big draw. Cash only orders are placed right at the kitchen window which, since it’s open most nights until 5 a.m., sees its fair share of interesting customers.

What Cambod-ican lacks in atmosphere, it makes up for with quirkiness, good prices and a friendly feel. Owner Dan McSwiggen keeps the energy level up, enthusiastically pushing wife Moeun’s kitchen creations like the Cambodian noodle soup, Caw Goh beef noodles and General Tso’s chicken.

Our pick: Crispy wontons with “moon” sauce. If you’re lucky enough to be offered the pickled Thai peppers from the back, say yes.

Location: 1701 East Carson St. on the South Side. Open: Tuesday – Saturday 6 p.m. – 5 a.m.

Late night empanadas and tacos at Pirata.
Late-night empanadas and tacos at Pirata. Photo by Tom O’Connor.

Pirata – Downtown

A late-night visit to Pirata is like a little island vacation. Open since October, the rum bar and Caribbean restaurant features 200 different rums and a late-night menu packed with big spices and savory island flavors. There’s a crowd-pleasing selection of empanadas, tacos, wings and sliders. Pirata keeps it simple with a special late-night menu that doesn’t overwhelm. Everything is easy to eat and share right at the bar. The late-night menu is offered Monday through Thursday from 10 p.m. to midnight.

If you want to learn about rum, this is your place. The bartenders are knowledgeable and sampling is made easy with a variety of rum flights. Pirata features rums from as far away as India, and as close by as Maggie’s Farm in The Strip.

Fortunately, the beer list is more about keeping beer lovers happy than sticking with the Caribbean theme. Spain and Argentina feature heavily on the wine list. For a little late-night pick-me-up, there’s cafe cubano and cafe con leche.

Our pick: Order a few different things to share but don’t miss the Jamaican beef patty empanadas.

Location: 274 Forbes Ave., Downtown. Open: Monday – Thursday 11 – 12 a.m., Friday – Saturday 11 – 2 a.m. and Sunday 12 – 9 p.m.

Yucca fries at Tres Rios. Photo by Tom O'Connor.
Yucca fries at Tres Rios. Photo by Tom O’Connor.

Tres Rios – The South Side

Tres Rios is a relatively new option along Carson Street on the South Side. The Mexican kitchen and tequila bar serves an upscale spin on street food until midnight on Friday and Saturday. Pork belly tacos and slow-roasted lamb tacos share the menu with crab cake and chicken tortas (Mexican sandwiches) served on grilled crusty bread. In addition to more unique combos, the Tres Rios kitchen prepares classic burritos, fajitas and made-to-order guacamole.

The bar menu features margaritas and cocktails made with a range of tequilas including blanco, reposado, and añejo. There’s a great beer list as well.

The pick: The delicious crispy yucca fries, served as a side or as an appetizer bowl topped with cheese sauce, beer-braised jalapeños, and chorizo.

Location: 1719 East Carson, South Side. Open:  Monday – Wednesday and Sunday 11 a.m. – 10 p.m., Thursday 11 a.m. – 11 p.m., Friday – Saturday 11 a.m. – midnight.

The "special sandwich" late night choice at Apteka. Photo by Tom O'Connor.
The “special sandwich” late-night choice at Apteka. Photo by Tom O’Connor.

Apteka – Bloomfield

Apteka makes for the perfect late-night spot that feels a little more soulful and nourishing. The vegan menu has a way of pleasing with its unique potato dumplings in rich broth and some of the most delicious pierogi you have ever tasted. There are also sandwiches, soups and small plates to try.

Place your order at the bar and grab a seat there, or at any of the tables. There’s a comfortable feel here that’s calm, homey and relaxed. There’s always good music in the background. At night, the ambience shifts to a pleasant darker and more lounge-like feel. On some nights, there’s a DJ handling the music. It’s a great place to dive in and explore different kinds of Central and Eastern European cuisine.

One tasty late-night option is the “special sandwich” featuring smoked chili paste, smoked apples, red cabbage slaw, garlic, salted turnip, savory sauce and a veggie pate. It’s a delicious explosion of flavors that work so well together, with just the right amount of crunch all served on tasty bread.

The cocktails are unique and seductive, often featuring a rotation of liqueurs, simple syrups, specially preserved fruits like cherries and black currants, fermented and pickled things, shrubs, and herbsall things that lean toward experimentation but also tell a story. Embracing something different can lead to great rewards here.

Our pick: The special sandwich is THE late-night choice, hands down.

Location: 4606 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. Open Wednesday – Sunday 5 p.m. – 1 a.m.

"The Korean" taco at Täkō. Photo by Tom O'Connor.
“The Korean” taco at Täkō. Photo by Tom O’Connor.

Täkō – Downtown

Täkō is all about street food, small plates and savory tacos with fresh ingredients served in unique combinations. Entering next to the streetfront kitchen feels like walking into a night market busy with revelers. The DJ spinning tunes and the vibrant visuals add to the nighttime energy. If you’re lucky enough to grab bar space, you’ll be very happy. Getting a table can sometimes be tricky without a reservation, so plan ahead if you need to because its really worth it.

Once you settle in, the menu has a big range of bold flavors with all kinds of tacos to try including grilled octopus, chorizo, grilled chicken and duck confit. There’s street corn, poke, ceviche and wings that make great late-night shares.

While many menu items are only offered until midnight, Täkō rolls out a special late-night menu “starting around 12-ish till we run out.” It’s a simpler, rotating selection that often includes loaded nachos and straightforward taco selections more in line with people’s post-midnight decision-making abilities.

All of these great tastes are served up alongside a big selection margaritas with bold and delicious taste combos. There’s a great list of tequila-based cocktails, beer, sangria and wine.

Our pick: The Korean—a scrumptious taco made with wagyu short rib, peanuts, fermented cucumber, cabbage and cilantro.

Location: 214 6th St., Downtown. Open Monday – Thursday 5 – 11 p.m., Friday – Saturday 5 p.m. to beyond midnight (times vary), Sunday 3 – 9 p.m.

English style chicken pot pie at The Pub Chip Shop. Photo by Tom O'Connor.
English style chicken pot pie at The Pub Chip Shop. Photo by Tom O’Connor.

The Pub Chip Shop – The South Side

British pub food classics like fish and chips, Scotch egg, sausage rolls and sandwiches made on fresh baked buttery rolls called “baps” are just some of the late-night highlights.  The Pub Chip Shop serves until midnight on Friday and Saturday. Locals know this place as the early morning home of Just Good Donuts. If you’re having a really late night, it’s almost worth hanging around for them to open at 6 a.m.—the doughnuts are that good, but that’s another story. 

The English-style savory pies here are neatly shaped with a homemade lard crust that is irresistibly flaky and delicious.

Our pick: Try the chicken pot pie or a steak and ale for an extra hearty late-night snack.

Location: 1830 East Carson St., The South Side. Open: Monday – Thursday 6 a.m. – 10 p.m., Friday – Saturday 6 a.m. – 12 a.m., Sunday 6 a.m. – 10 p.m.

Chief Pizziolo Joe Pepe at Fiori's Pizzaria. Photo by Tom O'Connor.
Chief Pizziolo Joe Pepe at Fiori’s Pizzaria. Photo by Tom O’Connor.

Fiori’s Pizzaria – Brookline

Pizza preference is hotly debated topic in this town. Spak BrothersMineo’sFiori’sA’Pizza Badamo—a lot of players with a strong pizza game. There’s also a good variety of styles like the wood-fired Italian classics at Piccolo FornoAnthony’s coal-fired pizzas, and the interesting cold-cheese-on-top twist at Beto’s. But who’s going to be there for you in the wee hours? Two Pittsburgh legends, Mineo’s in Squirrel Hill and Fiori’s in Brookline both serve up hand-tossed pies very very late (Mineo’s until 2 a.m. and Fiori’s until 3 a.m.).

If you’ve made the uphill trek on the cobblestone road to Fiori’s in Brookline, you know the payoff is delicious. Pizzas so heavy with cheese you need a furniture dolly to get to the car. Their crusts get raves for hitting the sweet spot between crunchy and chewy. The white pizza special is also a big hit.

Our pick: You can’t go wrong with any pizza choice here, but add on a calzone to-go with your order. They’re huge, and make great leftovers. Don’t forget to say yes to the extra container of sauce.

Location: 103 Capital Ave., Brookline. Open Sunday – Thursday 11 – 1 a.m., Friday – Saturday 11 – 3 a.m.

Honey-dipped fried chicken at Ritter's Diner. Photo by Tom O'Connor.
Honey-dipped fried chicken at Ritter’s Diner. Photo by Tom O’Connor.

Ritter’s Diner – Bloomfield

When you can’t decide if you want dinner or breakfast, it’s good to have all the options available. Ritter’s is a trip down memory lane for a lot of Pittsburghers, and most things here don’t change very often. There’s comfort in that. And sometimes in the middle of the night, you need comfort.

Breakfast can be a great way to end the night, and there’s nothing better than a stack of pancakes or a cheesy omelet with bacon on the side. But if your cravings are leaning more toward fried chicken or cheese fries or some Greek specialties, Ritter’s can still hook you up. Best of all, they’re almost always open.

Our pick: Honey-dipped fried chicken.

Location: 5221 Baum Blvd., Bloomfield. Open: Monday – Tuesday 6 a.m. – 1 a.m., Wednesday – Saturday 24 hours, Sunday until 10 p.m.

The classic "O" fries at The Original Hot Dog Shop. Photo by Tom O'Connor.
The classic “O” fries at The Original Hot Dog Shop. Photo by Tom O’Connor.

The Original Hot Dog Shop – Oakland

The Original Hot Dog Shop, or the “O,” as its known, has been a late-night fixture in the city for decades. It’s a classic choice for hot dogs, burgers, sandwiches, pizza and fries. Oh, and there’s beer, because you might need some to take home.

It’s pretty fun to watch the late-night lineup of slightly dazed people, fresh from the bars and now suddenly in harsh lighting, trying to make decisions about what to order. Lots of seating makes this an easy place to roll into late with a bigger group.

The pick: The “O” fries. Go big, then go home.

Location: 3901 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Open: Monday – Wednesday 10 a.m. – 9 p.m., Thursday – Sunday 10 a.m. – 1:30 a.m. For some of the history about this longtime Pittsburgh classic, be sure to check out their website.

Also worth notingBrillobox serves a late-night menu that includes burgers and banh mi sandwiches; Mike & Tonys Gyros serves late-night options until 3 a.m. Tuesday – Saturday.; Primanti Bros. in The Strip is open 24 hours; Eat’n Park serves a full menu including breakfast 24 hours a day.

The Original Hot Dog Shop. Photo by Tom O'Connor.
The Original Hot Dog Shop. Photo by Tom O’Connor.

 

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Powered by NEXTpittsburgh |  Michael Machosky

So, Fences is up for a lot of Academy Awards this year. It was mostly made in the same neighborhood where playwright August Wilson imagined itwith Denzel Washington’s Troy Maxson roaring across the Hill District of the ’50s like the literal wrecking ball that would smash through the neighborhood soon thereafter.

It’s both one of the best movies ever made in Pittsburgh, and one of the most Pittsburgh movies ever made. Those are two completely different things, of course.

For sheer Pittsburgh content (regardless of quality), it’s kind of hard to top Sudden Death (1995), which features a fight scene between Jean-Claude Van Damme and Iceburgh (the Penguins mascot) in the kitchen of the Civic Arena, using a deli meat slicer and a deep fryer as weapons. Flashdance (1983) is another Pittsburgh classicabout a steelworker/stripper (!), in a time-capsule-of-the-’80s sense. It was a massive hit, even though the critics hated it.

Picking the best movies made in Pittsburgh, though, is actually really tough. Even five years ago, it was easier. But the recent boom in Pittsburgh-made productions has knocked out some good-but-not-great movies, like Wonder Boys (2000), of the top 10.

As always, feel free to disagree, and add your own picks below. I feel like I’m going to change my mind already.

Tom Hardy in "The Dark Knight Rises" (2012).
Tom Hardy in “The Dark Knight Rises” (2012). Warner Bros. Entertainment, Inc. and Legendary Pictures Funding, LLC.

Tom Hardy in “The Dark Knight Rises” (2012). Warner Bros. Entertainment, Inc. and Legendary Pictures Funding, LLC.

10). The Dark Knight Rises (2012) is certainly the biggest movie ever made in Pittsburgh, making more than a billion dollars worldwide. Compared to the first two chapters in Christopher Nolan’s Dark Knight (Batman) trilogy, it’s a lugubrious, murky slog, with the franchise’s least interesting villain (Tom Hardy tried, but it’s hard to act with your mouth covered). Still, there are a few action sequences here that are simply stunning, such as the apocalyptic destruction of Heinz Field on game day. And by this point, the onrushing doom of Nolan’s vision has its own unstoppable momentum.

9.) Lightning Over Braddock: A Rustbowl Fantasy (1988): There’s always been a strong undercurrent of experimental cinema in Pittsburgh, going back to the ‘60s. To single out one superb example, there’s Tony Buba’s sublimely weird Lightning Over Braddock. It’s about both the economic implosion of a working class steel town paradise, and some goofball local character named Sal, who periodically hijacks the whole movie, steering it towards his own esoteric, self-aggrandizing ends. You’ll never see another movie like it.

8.) The Perks of Being a Wallflower (2012): In the social hierarchy of high school, being a wallflowerthe shy, observant sortis only slightly above hall monitors and kids crammed into lockers. But for freshman Charlie (Logan Lerman), there are some perks, like being adopted by an older clique of worldly misfits, including a girl who was a wizard in a past life (Emma Watson). Somehow, of the three great coming-of-age novels of Pittsburgh adolescence, the best book, Michael Chabon’s The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, made the worst movie. The second best book, Jesse Andrews’ brilliant and underrated Me and Earl and the Dying Girl, made a very good movie (just missing this list). However, Stephen Chbosky’s Perks takes the crown, through outstanding performances from its leads.

"Dawn of the Dead" (1978).
Ken Foree in “Dawn of the Dead” (1978). The MKR Group, Inc.

Ken Foree in “Dawn of the Dead” (1978). The MKR Group, Inc.

7.) Dawn of the Dead (1978): The legendary first sequel to Night of the Living Dead has some surprisingly sharp satire of modern consumer culture buried beneath the endless severed limbs and decapitated heads. A few lonely survivors try to ride out the apocalypse holed up in Monroeville Mall, while the undead return to wander endlessly, aimlesslynot that much differently than when they were alive, actually. Who knew the world would end not with a bang or a whimper, but with an all-you-can-eat buffet (of humans) at the mall?

Tim Robbins and Giancarlo Esposito in "Bob Roberts" (1992).
Tim Robbins and Giancarlo Esposito in “Bob Roberts” (1992).

Tim Robbins and Giancarlo Esposito in “Bob Roberts” (1992).

6.) Bob Roberts (1992): Though obviously intended as political satire, it now hits a bit too close to homelike some sort of demonic prophecy foretold. Actor/writer/director Tim Robbins plays a genial folk-singing fascist, an entertainer who makes the jump to a Pennsylvania Senate race by preying on the fears and worst instincts of the marginal and the gullible. He cleverly inverts Bob Dylanesque protest songs into anthems about lynching drug dealers (and users), and the lazy immigrants and welfare queens living large on your unwitting largesse: “Times are Changin’ Back,” “Retake America,” “My Land.” It’s funny and ridiculous until, suddenly, it’s not. Still probably less absurd than our current political reality.

5.) Fences (2016): It’s impossible to know how this will age, or how it will relate to the rest if Denzel Washington adapts all 10 of August Wilson’s Pittsburgh Cycle plays for the screen. At times, Fences feels more like a play than a movie, but that’s really the only criticism that sticks. By now, the role fits Washington like an old catcher’s mitt. He and Viola Davis reprise the roles that won them Tonys on Broadway, wearing the pain and sorrow and fleeting bits of joy of their fenced-in characters as if August Wilson is still watching.

"Slap Shot" (1977).
Paul Newman in “Slap Shot” (1977). Universal Pictures.

Paul Newman in “Slap Shot” (1977). Universal Pictures.

4.) Slap Shot (1977). Another genre that rarely gets respect is the sports movie. Slap Shot (shot in Johnstown, Pittsburgh and upstate New York),  might be the funniest and best movie about sports ever made. It’s a rite of passage for hockey fans, and explains the pugnacious, blue-collar soul of the sport like nothing else. Though it’s easy to miss amidst all the blood and unbelievably crude jokes, there’s also an undercurrent of foreboding hereadroitly depicting a looming crisis of masculinity, when the mills and factories are shutting down, and people are clinging to any bit of hope and camaraderie they can find.

3.) The Deer Hunter (1978): This film is a panoramic portrait of mill town martyrdom, as souls forged in the steel mills of Western Pennsylvania are fed into the final furnace of Vietnam. Robert DeNiro, Christopher Walken and Meryl Streep all appear at the peaks of their respective powers. From the wild Russian Orthodox wedding to the prison camp game of Russian roulette, this is the sort of cinematic moonshot that either launches or detonates careers. For Michael Cimino, it was the former, until its catastrophic follow-up, Heaven’s Gate (1980), became the latter.

2.) The Silence of the Lambs (1991): Serial killers have kind of been done to death (sorry), but it’s hard to overstate how unsettling and original this seemed back in 1991. It won Academy Awards in the Big 5 categories: Best Picture, Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Director and Adapted Screenplay, which never happens, and horror movies rarely get nominated for anything in the first place. Also, the house in Fayette County (which is pretty nice!) where the killer, uh, did bad stuff, took forever to sell, because . . . well, we don’t really know. But go ahead, you try to live there.

"Night of the Living Dead" (1968).
Judith O’Dea in “Night of the Living Dead” (1968).

Judith O’Dea in “Night of the Living Dead” (1968).

1.) Night of the Living Dead (1968): In town for the Pittsburgh premiere of Land of the Dead in 2005, filmmaker Quentin Tarantino mentioned that the American independent movie was born in Pittsburgh with George Romero’s Night of the Living Dead. Romero (who previously worked on Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood), along with some friends, family and friends-of-friends, didn’t realize they were inventing the modern horror movie or a zombie genre that still refuses to die. The claustrophobic, walls-closing-in sets, shadowy black & white film, and tense, wartime newsreel-like cinematography weren’t selected to maximize terrorthey were just cheap. The guts and innards yanked from screaming victims weren’t elaborate special effectsthey were pieces of meat the butcher shop didn’t want. Duane Jones wasn’t intended to break new ground for African-American actorshe just gave the best audition. In 1999, the movie was selected for preservation in the National Film Registry at the Library of Congress.

Got a favorite movie made in Pittsburgh that we didn’t mention? Here’s your chance in the comments below.

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