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On the heels of Zagat’s proclamation in December that Pittsburgh is America’s No. 1 food city, The New York Times recently weighed in:

“Everybody seems so young. And everybody’s talking about restaurants. If there are scholars who hope to study how a vibrant food culture can help radically transform an American city, the time to do that is right now, in real time, in the place that gave us Heinz ketchup.”

The full essay by Jeff Gordinier, “Pittsburgh’s Youth-Driven Food Boom,” is below and here (along with a photo slide show from Pittsburgh-based photographer Jeff Swensen).

PITTSBURGH — It hits you as soon as you get to town.

There’s the purple-haired free spirit at the Ace Hotel who gives you the lowdown on outlaw poetry gatherings and killer pizza. There are the art kids offering tips at the Andy Warhol Museum, and the tyro entrepreneurs strategizing over cocktails at the Tender Bar & Kitchen in Lawrenceville, the neighborhood along the Allegheny River that is shifting from a desolate zone where your laptop might get stolen to the place where butcher paper in the windows signifies a bumper crop of new restaurants. There’s the 25-year-old Uber driver who shoots you a crucial heads-up: “The best bartender in the world is working tonight.”

Everybody seems so young. And everybody’s talking about restaurants. If there are scholars who hope to study how a vibrant food culture can help radically transform an American city, the time to do that is right now, in real time, in the place that gave us Heinz ketchup.

In December, Zagat named Pittsburgh the No. 1 food city in America. Vogue just went live with a piece that proclaimed, “Pittsburgh is not just a happening place to visit — increasingly, people, especially New Yorkers, are toying with the idea of moving here.”

Kelly Sawdon, an executive with the Ace chain, said the company spent years trying to raise money to convert a torn-and-frayed Y.M.C.A. into a hip hotel because the “energy” of the city suggested a blossoming marketplace. Food, she said, has been the catalyst.

For decades, Pittsburgh was hardly seen as a beacon of innovative cuisine or a magnet for the young. It was the once-glorious metropolis that young people fled from after the shuttering of the steel mills in the early 1980s led to a mass exodus and a stark decline.

“We had to reinvent ourselves,” said Bill Peduto, Pittsburgh’s mayor.

And they have. Over the last decade or so, the city has been the beneficiary of several overlapping booms. Cheap rent and a voracious appetite for culture have attracted artists. Cheap rent and Carnegie Mellon University have attracted companies like Google, Facebook and Uber, seeking to tap local tech talent. And cheap rent alone has inspired chefs to pursue deeply personal projects that might have a hard time surviving in the Darwinian real estate microclimates of New York and San Francisco.

No one can pinpoint whether it was the artists or techies or chefs who got the revitalization rolling. But there’s no denying that restaurants play a starring role in the story Pittsburgh now tells about itself. The allure of inhabiting a Hot New Food Town — be it Nashville or Richmond, Va., or Portland (Oregon or Maine) — helps persuade young people to visit, to move in and to stay.

Recent census data shows that Allegheny County’s millennial population is on the rise. People ages 25 to 29 now make up 7.6 percent of all residents, up from 7 percent about a decade ago; the 30-to-34 age group now comprises 6.5 percent, up from 6 percent.

Years ago, local boosters proposed a tongue-in-cheek advertising campaign starring a mascot called Border Guard Bob, who would dissuade young people from abandoning the city’s Rust Belt remains. “That has changed dramatically,” said Craig Davis, the chief executive of Visit Pittsburgh. He said the median age in Pittsburgh is 32.8, well below the national figure, 37.7.

That’s good news for tourism; 2,800 hotel rooms have been added in Pittsburgh since 2011. “We’re really using the food scene as a driver of that,” Mr. Davis said. “There’s a reason to come to the city.”

It is also good news for business and culture leaders who seek out young employees and customers. When job candidates arrive, the new wave of restaurants is brandished as a selling point.

“The food scene in Pittsburgh is actually responsible for our landing some best-in-the-world types of people,” said Andrew Moore, the dean of the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon and a founder of Google’s first office in the city.

Google’s presence has since expanded considerably — and almost in sync with the restaurant surge. Pittsburgh’s mayor said the food boom had played a pivotal role in restoring neighborhoods, evidence of an “entrepreneurial attitude throughout the city.”

“Ten years ago, you had some visionaries, some young people who had a dream of owning their own restaurants,” Mr. Peduto said. “They took a risk — they really did believe the place had this amazing potential.”

One of those pioneers was Domenic Branduzzi, who opened a spot calledPiccolo Forno in the Lawrenceville area 11 years ago as a way to showcase the specialties that his family had brought to western Pennsylvania from Tuscany.

“I’m an O.G.’’ — an original gangsta — “in the neighborhood,” Mr. Branduzzi said on a recent afternoon as customers filled the cocktail bar atGrapperia, a second Lawrenceville spot of his, which was celebrating its first anniversary. “If I ever want to be transported to my grandmother’s kitchen when I was a kid, I taste one bite of the lasagna.”

In the early days of Piccolo Forno, Mr. Branduzzi was warned that Pittsburghers weren’t likely to take a chance on old-school items like rabbit or wild boar. “People thought it was crazy and that it would never sell,” he said. “And now I can’t take rabbit off the menu.”

Being shielded from crushing rent increases allows Pittsburgh chefs to take risks and cook the way they want to cook without constantly fretting about going under.

“Pittsburgh is the land of opportunity for chefs,” said Justin Severino, another Lawrenceville pioneer whose Cure, which he opened on a dingy stretch of Butler Street in 2010, has won national accolades. He’s got a second baby in Lawrenceville now, too — a brand-new Basque-style pintxos restaurant called Morcilla.

A veteran of the acclaimed Manresa, in Northern California, Mr. Severino, now 38, fled the Bay Area when he realized that he couldn’t even afford a beer and a sandwich with friends, let alone a vacation or a house. In Pittsburgh he saw the capacity for ownership, and change. “While the rest of the country was floundering, Pittsburgh stood on the gas and reinvented itself as a city,” he said.

This is not to say that creating Cure was easy. Lawrenceville still has its fair share of graffiti and abandoned storefronts, but “you should’ve seen that neighborhood five years ago,” Mr. Severino said. “I got to know the prostitutes who worked the corner. I got to know the drug dealers who hated my guts.” He was always calling the police; thieves broke into Cure repeatedly.

Through it all, he stuck to his philosophy: “I’m just going to do what I want to do without regard for what people say they want.”

Early adopters like Mr. Severino, Mr. Branduzzi, Sonja Finn of Dinette,Kate Romane of e2, and Richard DeShantz of Meat & Potatoes proved that chef-driven cuisine could flourish alongside steel-town fixtures likeTessaro’s and Primanti Brothers. The next generation is grabbing that message and running with it.

At Whitfield, the new restaurant inside the Ace Hotel, Brent Young, a native son who had helped build the Meat Hook butcher shop in Brooklyn, lobbied passionately for a job conceiving the whole-animal-fixated menu, and brought in the locally grown chef Bethany Zozula and the pastry chef Casey Shively to run the kitchen. Whitfield opened in December; reaction was quick and unexpected. “On New Year’s Eve, we had a line around the building,” Ms. Zozula said.

In the Strip District, the marketplace zone that Mayor Peduto referred to as “the heart of western Pennsylvania’s food culture,” Ben Mantica and Tyler Benson, two 20-something entrepreneurs who met in the Navy, are bringing the model of a tech incubator to the food world. Their Smallman Galley consists of four kiosks in which different chefs showcase their cooking for 18 months. The chefs pay no rent; the hope is that they’ll build a following and create their own restaurants.

Mr. Mantica and Mr. Benson see Smallman as a way to cater to the tastes of the young employees of Apple, Uber and Google who are starting to occupy new apartments in the area. “We’ve seen this huge demographic shift in Pittsburgh, and now it’s a matter of, ‘What do those people want?’” Mr. Benson said.

To the northeast of Smallman Galley, in Lawrenceville, the chef Csilla Thackray and the restaurateur Joey Hilty, both in their 20s, are trying to carve out their own slice of the marketplace with the Vandal, a casual restaurant that’s open for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

Mr. Hilty grew up near Pittsburgh, and said he had plans to leave for New York or Oregon after college, but “I had too much debt. So I slowly figured out what my contribution would be to the city.” He is glad he stayed. Lawrenceville, he said, is “very youthful and it’s full of unbridled enthusiasm for this stuff.”

But there is ambivalence as well. Young restaurateurs know how gentrification works; they’ve witnessed it in Brooklyn and San Francisco. Rents rise. People get squeezed out. “We all see where it’s going to be in five years,” Mr. Hilty said. “The barrier to entry’s going to be so high.”

Ms. Thackray added, “It’s really cool — and then the bubble bursts.”

Like winning the lottery, being crowned a Hot New Food Town can complicate things. Despite his trailblazing, Mr. Severino has noticed how Lawrenceville’s newer inhabitants view him as something of a square. “Most of those hipsters hate me,” he said with a laugh. “They’ll go out of their way to tell me what a yuppie I am.”

Some of the more thoughtful leaders of Pittsburgh’s cultural youthquake find themselves vexed — worrying that the city they wanted to live in could turn, over time, into its glossy and expensive opposite, a place that evicts older residents and prices out younger ones.

“Look, I like good coffee, I like good bread, I like good food,” said Adam Shuck, 29, who writes an e-newsletter called “Eat That, Read This” and is developing The Glassblock, a web magazine about the city. “I’m torn. I love this stuff, and I’m not going to say I don’t. I welcome and applaud this changing Pittsburgh.”

On the other hand, “there’s also a part of Pittsburgh that has been left out of this excitement,” Mr. Shuck said in an email. “Poverty, food deserts and lack of opportunity and access in historically marginalized communities are big problems in Pittsburgh, and all of the praise and celebration can ring a bit hollow when you consider these realities. Nitro coffee and slow bread are not at the top of your list when you can’t even get to a grocery store.”

The present is exciting in Pittsburgh. The future? That depends.

“We just have to stay vigilant in how Pittsburgh’s redevelopment takes place,” Mr. Shuck said, “fostering the conversation and pressuring government and private capital to work together to do it right.”

If You Go …

Ace Hotel 120 South Whitfield Street; 412-361-3300; acehotel.com/pittsburgh.

Cure 5336 Butler Street; 412-252-2595; curepittsburgh.com.

Dinette 5996 Centre Avenue; 412-362-0202; dinette-pgh.com.

e2 5904 Bryant Street; 412-441-1200; e2pgh.com.

Grapperia 3801 Butler Street; 412-904-3907; grapperiapgh.com.

Meat & Potatoes 649 Penn Avenue; 412-325-7007; meatandpotatoespgh.com.

Morcilla 3519 Butler Street; 412-652-9924; morcillapittsburgh.com.

Piccolo Forno 3801 Butler Street; 412-622-0111; piccolo-forno.com.

Primanti Brothers 1832 East Carson Street; 412-325-2455; primantibros.com.

Smallman Galley 54 21st Street; 412-315-5950; smallmangalley.org.COMMENTS

Tender Bar & Kitchen 4300 Butler Street; 412-402-9522; tenderpgh.com.

Tessaro’s 4601 Liberty Avenue; 412-682-6809; tessaros.com.

The Vandal 4306 Butler Street; 412-251-0465; thevandalpgh.com.

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October rocks, with heavy hitters like VIA, Maker Faire and Reel Q, plus tacos galore, the cult of Lebowski, dogs in costume, and even some yinzer gore. It was a challenge to pick just 12, so check out our events section each week for more.

DogtoberFEST
Courtesy DogtoberFEST.

1. DogtoberFEST at The Waterfront: October 1

Whether you’re ready to add a canine companion to your clan or are looking for a festive fall outing for your favorite four-legged friend, head to The Waterfront for an afternoon celebrating all things canine (and some cats too!). Pittsburgh’s largest animal adoption event, DogtoberFEST will feature 64 shelters, breed-specific rescue groups and vendors. Attendees can meet adoptable dogs, shop for pet-themed products and doggie goodies at a specialty vendor market and bake sale, pick up resources from vets and trainers, and more. The free, outdoor festival will also feature live music by The Real Deal, search and rescue demonstrations led by Nosework, and a recreational enrichment trail for pups. If your dog loves to don garb, don’t miss the Pooch Pride Parade Costume The free furry fun is presented by the Coalition to Adopt, Rehome and Match Abandoned Animals and Robinson Animal Hospital.

Smithfield United Church of Christ
Smithfield United Church of Christ. Amy Cicconi Photography.

2. Doors Open Pittsburgh: October 1 & 2

If you’re like us, you’ve strolled the streets of downtown, looked up to spot a carved gargoyle, intricate spire, or green roof and thought to yourself: I wish I could go inside. Now you can. Swinging open the doors to some of Pittsburgh’s most iconic structures, this first-of-its-kind event features behind-the-scenes access at 40 downtown buildings—including historic landmarks and off-the-beaten-path gems. From private clubs to chic hotels—it’s your chance to experience Pittsburgh’s storied structures, rich architectural heritage, and diverse urban landscape. Peer into the magical “forever mirrors” at the Benedum Center, wander through the Allegheny Harvard, Yale and Princeton Club—originally built in 1894 as workers’ row houses—and explore ornate, early-19th-century masterpieces erected by industrialists like Henry Clay Frick. Inside the Flemish Gothic Union Trust Building, you’ll experience the awe-inspiring central rotunda, 10-story atrium and breathtaking Tiffany glass dome. Bask in the Beaux-Arts splendor of The Pennsylvanian, tour an aquaponics site and enjoy rooftop access at the convention center. Don’t just walk past quickly without noticing, look up and go on in. Download the event guide.

Pittsburgh Taco Festival
Pittsburgh Taco Festival.

3. Pittsburgh Taco Festival at Hop Farm Brewing: October 2

The city’s love affair with the small but mighty traditional Mexican dish will be on the front burner at the first of what we hope will be an annual affair. Bringing 20 top taquerias together, the highly buzzed about Taco Festival will feature everyone from Edgar’s and Round Corner Cantina, to La Palapa and Mission Mahi. Boasting one of the largest selections of tacos in the Burgh, the event will also feature a Chihuahua costume contest and a taco-themed mercado. Slinging the goods at Hop Farm Brewing—because nothing tastes better with tacos than beer—the festival offers two afternoon sessions with live music by DJ Mateo and Gavas Beat. The brainchild of Pittsburghers Craig and Bridget McCloud—self-professed taco lovers who operate Popsburgh, a food cart selling handmade Mexican paletas—the event celebrates the couple’s favorite handmade street food. Dig in for a cause because this tasty fest benefits Allegheny CleanWays’ mission to eliminate illegal dumping and littering. Buy tickets now because this foodie fiesta is expected to sell out.

UpPrize
UpPrize finals event. Photo: Erika Gidley.

4. UpPrize networking event at AlphaLab Gear: October 6

Have a grand idea and want to take it to the next level? UpPrize, the social innovation challenge created by The Forbes Funds with partners BNY Mellon and Bridgeway Capital, is back after its stellar debut last year. You’re invited to share your best and brightest solutions and help NEXTpittsburgh launch the latest round during this free networking event. Called “the networking event of the year” by AlphaLab Gear‘s Ilana Diamond, the night will feature great food, local craft beer, and the chance for citizens, cohorts, organizations, and others to envision solutions addressing two challenge areas: access to healthy food and innovative technology. Imagine yourself in a room packed with entrepreneurs, nonprofits, funders and techies—with every chance to talk social innovation and network for all you’re worth—and you’ve got the picture. Applications will be accepted between October 1 and November 30. Each challenge offers a $350,000 award. Finalists will be selected by January 2017.  This is close to being filled so hurry. Learn more about UpPrizeRegister now.

Aye Nako
Aye Nako from Brooklyn.

5. VIA Music & New Media Festival: October 6 – 9 at Ace Hotel

For four days Pittsburgh will be at the epicenter of experimental music and audiovisual culture. It’s fitting that for its 7th ambitious edition, the previously nomadic VIA Festival will make the city’s newest boutique hotel its flagship laboratory for cutting-edge audio and visual presentations. VIA and East Liberty have a collaborative history, with the festival popping up in its formerly vacant urban spaces and running an underground venue at 6119 Penn (RIP). The thoughtfully curated fest features 40-plus artists and 15 main events, highlighting unlikely pairings in sound, new media, performance and technology. Staunchly multi-disciplinary, multi-sensory and multi-format, the star-studded lineup brings together legends and legends in the making—several making their Pittsburgh debut—such as Cannes winner Giant, Rihanna collaborator Sam Rolfes, iconic rapper Rakim, and South Bronx pioneers ESG. Free highlights include a discussion with landmark black female artists, a master class with Brooklyn performance duo Fluct and a hands-on coding and digital drawing game titledExquisite Donut. What sets VIA apart in a sea of festivals? Its commitment to including local artists, and rich opportunities for attendees to be active participants in featured artworks. Projecting out from Ace, VIA also offers satellite events at non-traditional spaces such as pop-up galleries, theaters, libraries, universities and more. View a schedule and buy tickets.

King Cobra
King Cobra, Justin Kelly (2016).

6. Reel Q Film Festival at the Harris Theater: October 6 – 15

Get ready to strike a pose at Reel Q. Boasting standout performances from Madonna to James Franco to Isabella Rossellini, Pittsburgh’s annual presentation of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender cinema returns for its most star-studded festival in Reel Q history. Spanning film, television and Broadway, this year’s festivities bring 10 days of diverse programming to downtown’s Cultural District. We all know about the Material Girl, but what about the talented male dancers who performed with the pop icon? Reel Q kicks off with a bang, presenting the behind-the-scenes story of the dancers who performed with Madonna during her legendary 1990 Blond Ambition World Tour. Don your 1980s-era garb, because the film will be followed by a Madge-themed after-party at Bricolage. Reel Q wraps with a stellar pairing of Oscar-nominated actor James Franco and Golden Globe winner Christian Slater, who star in Justin Kelly’s 2016 film, King Cobra—a gripping true story about a murder scandal that rocked the adult entertainment industry. Reel Q also features themed shorts, French cinema, 20th-anniversary classics, a closing party and more. View a scheduleBuy tickets.

Pittsburgh Abides
Courtesy Pittsburgh Abides.

7. Pittsburgh Abides Big Lebowski Fest: October 8 at Spirit

In August, fans on all continents mourned the passing of David Huddleston, who played the title role in the iconic 1998 Coen brothers film, The Big Lebowski. Here to give 412 achievers their annual fix of the cult flick—while anointing new generations of Dudes—is Pittsburgh’s homegrown take on a quirky festival held around the globe. Slip into that beige bathrobe, mix up a White Russian and spew witty Dudeisms, when Spirit becomes a playpen for everybody’s favorite slacker. More than a movie screening, the 4th annual shindig is bigger than ever with two floors of Dudery hosted by charismatic artist Alexi Morrissey. Be an achiever as you play rounds of ear spitting, ringer toss and trivia, ride a zip line, and compete in a citywide scavenger hunt (bring them a toe by 3 p.m.!). Pitch your Lebowski sequel to actor/director Patrick Jordan, show off your dance moves in a competition judged by Attack Theatre’s Peter Kope and score under par in a mini-golf course designed by Pittsburgh artists. Wash it all down with classic rock performed by the F*cking bEagle Brothers and Charlie Hustle and the Grifters. Buy tickets.

Grindhouse Wetware
Courtesy Grindhouse Wetware.

8. Maker Faire Pittsburgh on the Northside: October 15 & 16

Where can you watch a robot sort trash and recyclables and witness a hand-cranked Gatling gun fire off 144 rubber bands? Dubbed “the greatest show-and-tell on Earth, Maker Faire lands on the Northside for two days jam-packed with wondrous exhibits, demos, performances, and activities—spanning every category under the sun, like the Internet of Things, Steampunk, gaming and more. Pittsburgh’s second foray into the Maker Faire phenom will flood Buhl Community Park, Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh and Nova Place with a melting pot of makers, tinkerers, inventors, techies and beyond. Equal parts science club, county fair and DIY confluence, Maker Faire brings together some of the region’s most inventive minds—from cutting-edge roboticists to kid inventors to commercial entrepreneurs. Delve into the fascinating world of biohacking, play a fun new lawn game handmade in Pittsburgh, and learn basic coding and animation techniques to customize your own Pokémon characters. Step into an augmented reality sandbox to create digital art and interact with colorful projections, topographic maps and photo portraits. View a schedule and buy tickets.

FUSE@PSO
FUSE@PSO. Photo by Wade Massie.

9. FUSE@PSO presents Bartók + Björk at Heinz Hall: October 19

Ready to meet the lovechild of Hungarian composer Béla Bartók and Icelandic icon Björk? Musically speaking that is. The synergistic sonic results just may surprise you. If you missed the rousing debut of conductor Steve Hackman’s FUSE@PSOlast year, then you have three fantastic chances to catch the cutting-edge series when it returns. Boldly going where most symphonies don’t venture, FUSE pairs contemporary and classical masterpieces to forge bold musical hybrids. For its 2016 launch, Hackman will conjure a vibrant and evocative mashup of Bartók’s 1943 Concerto for Orchestra, and 11 striking songs from Björk’s seminal albums—DebutPost and Homogenic. The one-of-a-kind concert will showcase the vocal talents of Malia Civetz, Carla Kihlstedt and Kristin Slipp. With Hackman at the helm, the production will explore Bartók’s love of Western art music and eastern European folk music along with the eclectic vision of Björk, which spans pop, electronica, jazz and more. Arrive at 5 p.m. for a lively happy hour in Heinz Hall’s sublime garden, featuring specially-priced drinks, activities, snacks and mingling with the musicians. The concert starts at 6:30 p.m. and it’s open seating with drinks allowed. Buy ticketsPlease note: Due to the current PSO Musicians’ strike, concerts through October 27 have been canceled. For more information, please visitpittsburghsymphony.org and PSOupdate.com.

Wigle Whiskey
Courtesy of Wigle Whiskey.

10. Walkabout Apple Whiskey Weekend: October 21, 22, 23

Where can you bob for apples and drink them in your whiskey? Channel the spirit of Johnny Appleseed—who introduced apple trees to Pennsylvania—celebrate the fall harvest season and be among the first to taste Wigle‘s new cider-infusedwhiskey at this weekend-long festival. At Wigle‘s Strip District distillery and Northside barrelhouse, Walkabouters will sample the new release, sip autumnal cocktails, grab grub from food trucks, bob for apples, and take selfies with Johnny Appleseed. Free and family-friendly, the festivities will include presentations by the Apple Whiskey development team, apple-themed games with City of Play and live music by The Lonely Lights and Chris Hannigan. Created in collaboration with Chatham University’s Food Studies Program, Wigle’s newest concoction is a base of rye and wheat whiskey hand-blended from 15-gallon casks. Savor the robustly-flavored results for yourself as you enjoy this custom blend of hearty apple cider and subtle sweetness on a crisp fall day. For more whiskey, check out the Pittsburgh Whiskey & Fine Spirits Festival October 28 at Rivers Casino.

El Vez
El Vez, photo by Randall Michelson.

11. Night of 1,000 Elvises at The Warhol Museum: October 22

Warhol turned repetition into a global art phenomenon using everyday objects and pop icons. You’ll see much more than double at the museum’s signature fundraiser, back with a creative new twist riffing on one of the Warhol’s favorite subjects. Whether you prefer him as a guitar-slinging Army sergeant, rockabilly bad boy or 1970s lounge crooner, it’s not too early to start crafting your over-the-top Elvis ensemble for this glittery tribute to all things The King—and King of Pop. Channeling the Tupelo tornado will be the self-proclaimed “Mexican Elvis,” El Vez (aka singer-songwriter Robert Lopez), who has not performed locally since 1998. Attendees can get marked with Elvis-inspired temporary tattoos, swing their hips Memphis-style during DJ sets and shop for iconic Warholian wares. Elvises will have access to the museum’s seven floors, and will be the first to see the new exhibition, Andy Warhol: My Perfect Body. Featuring 200 artworks, the first-of-its-kind show explores Warhol’s focus on the human body—abstracted, tormented, sculpted and idealized—and delves into his personal struggles with physical appearance. VIPers will have access to an exclusive underground “Viva Las Vegas” lounge featuring casino games, unlimited drinks and hors d’oeuvres. Buy tickets.

Bricolage
Artwork by Joe Mruk, Red Buffalo Illustration.

12. Night of the Living Dead N’at: October 27 – November 12

Ever since the first zombie crawled out of a western Pennsylvania cemetery in George Romero’s 1968 seminal cult classic,Night of the Living Dead—literally spawning a new genre—Pittsburgh has nurtured a love affair with horror films. With the spooky season upon us, Bricolage is breathing new life—and death—into the cinematic classic, updating it with a raucous yinzer twist. Bricolage’s longtime fan favorite Midnight Radio Series returns to dish out a comedy-laden revamping of the flick complete with a contemporary “yinzerized” script adapted by the company’s producing artistic director, Tami Dixon. Paying homage to the Godfather of Zombies, the spine-tingling show will be augmented by the eerie live music of classical rock powerhouse Cello Fury. Via its trademark 1940s radio format, Midnight Radio will also showcase live Foley sound effects, commercial spoofs, and a dub over the film screening using Dixon’s clever script. For added gore, don’t miss the pre-show Happy Half-Hour and The Brains N’at Ball on Halloween. Buy tickets.

Check out more events every week in NEXTpittsburgh, including these coming up in October:

VIA
VIA visual artist Chris Coleman.

StepTrek in the South Side Slopes: October 1
Esperanza Spalding presents Emily’s D+Evolution at the August Wilson Center: October 7
Weird Reality Symposium at Carnegie Mellon: October 6—9
Quantum Theatre’s The River at Aspinwall Roverfront Park: October 7—30
Patti Smith lecture at Carnegie Music Hall: October 10 (sold-out)
Tig Notaro at Carnegie Library of Homestead: October 14
Pittsburgh Zine Fair at the Union Project: October 16
Third Thursday: EDEN at Carnegie Museum of Art: October 20
ReelAbilities Film Festival: October 20—November 2
Global Links’ Dia de los Muertos fundraiser: October 22
Hometown-Homegrown at the Heinz History Center: October 22

Looking for live music? Read our Everything you need to know about Pittsburgh concerts in October feature.

Looking for events for families and children? Check out our 10 great family adventures in Pittsburgh this Septemberfeature.

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Arrived2nd rotatorWelcome to Pittsburgh – the “new cool,” a city topping lists for hippest neighborhoods, great places to eat and outdoors fun in all four seasons. You’ve arrived, so settle in and get to know the campus. Make new friends. And when you’re ready, grab your friends and get off campus. There’s an entire city to discover with adventures that are nearby and easy on the wallet, if not totally free!

Ready to start exploring now? Check out some great upcoming activities and events at ImaginePittsburgh.com/Play and gear up for a life you’ll love … in Pittsburgh.

Click here to learn about Pittsburgh as the new cool, and whether our Lawrenceville neighborhood really is the new Brooklyn.

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From massive stadium shows to neighborhood-spanning festivals, August has something for everybody. Here’s a closer look at some of the more notable concerts in Pittsburgh in August:

August starts off slowly, with a pair of golden-voiced crooners, Josh Groban and Sarah McLachlan, headlining First NiagaraAugust 2. Former American Idol contestant Phillip Phillips visits Stage AE that same night, with support from singer/songwriter Matt Nathanson. Vancouver indie punk act White Lung headlines Club Cafe August 3. (Their new album, Paradise, earned Pitchfork‘s vaunted “Best New Music” designation.) Thursday, August 4, Coldplay comes to town to play Consol, their first Pittsburgh visit since 2009. Chris Martin and co. are touring in support of A Head Full of Dreams, their seventh studio album. A pair of female singer/songwriters, Alessia Cara and Foxes (Louisa Allen), open.

Pittsburgh regulars O.A.R. headline an outdoor show at Stage AE August 5, almost a year to the day they played PNC Park. That same night, country superstar Brad Paisley visits First Niagara. Opening for Paisley are Tyler Farr and Maddie & Tae, best known for their single “Girl in a Country Song,” which pokes fun at stereotypical portrayals of women in country music songs. Also, singer-songwriter Jasmine Tate returns home for an intimate show at the Pittsburgh Winery.

On Saturday, August 6, party like a Rox star at the free McKees Rocks Feastival. This year’s headliners include a pair of Brooklyn-based funk bands, Turkuaz and Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds, as well as another funk band,Dumpstaphunk, from New Orleans. There will be nearly 20 food trucks on hand, plus the I Made It! Market and an arts and crafts area for the little ones. And be sure to check out the free after-party at the Rex Theater later that evening.

Otherwise, don’t miss Baltimore indie rock duo Wye Oak at Club Cafe, touring in support of their June release, Tween, which has been landing better reviews than their previous album, probably because they brought back their guitars for this one.

The weekend wraps up with Relapse Records artist Nothing at Cattivo August 7. The Philly shoegaze/post-rock outfit churns out wave after wave of atmospheric guitar fuzz, perfect for fans of Slowdive, Whirr, or MBV.

Things pick up the second week of August, beginning August 9 with the grit and boogie of Brooklyn’s Broncho at Club Cafe, bolstered by openers Nevada Color. For even more fuzzed-out guitars head to Spirit for The Ghost Wolves, a garage-rock duo from Austin. There’s also a sold out performance by Halsey at Stage AE that same night.

The next day, August 10, includes a performance by Kesha and The Creepies. According to Rolling Stone, the pop superstar will use the seven-date tour to premiere “dirty rock & roll and country music,” including, she says, “songs you’ve never heard me play before and I may never play again.” The show is sold-out except for VIP packages.

That same night, the Prince of the City, Wiz Khalifa, performs with hip-hop’s favorite OG uncle, Snoop Dogg. Also on the bill are Kevin Gates, Jhené Aiko, Casey Veggies, and DJ Drama. Snoop is scheduled for an appearance at Diesel after the First Niagara gig, but odds are it won’t be much more than a brief appearance, like when 50 Cent stopped by to promote his vodka.

On August 11, metalcore favorites Killswitch Engage open for Danish metal band Volbeat at Stage AE. It’s also day one of1Hood Day, Pittsburgh’s annual hip-hop festival, organized by 1Hood Media. Day one features a dozen up-and-coming musicians and rappers, while day two (hosted by David Banner!) features performances by some of 1Hood’s most well-known performers of conscious hip-hop, including, Idasa Tariq, Blak Rapp Madusa, and Jasiri X. The event takes place atAnthony Rivers Park in East Liberty.

Speaking of local festivals, August 12 is day one for RANT, the Rock All Night Tour. “It’s a true showcase of what this city has to offer in the world of live music,” says event organizer, Mary Jo Coll. Now in its fifth year, over 200(!) local acts will play at 30+ venues in and around Lawrenceville, all for free. August 12 is also the kick-off for the three-day Heritage Bluesfest in Wheeling, West Virginia, featuring Shemekia Copeland, Butch Trucks, and many more.

If you’re somehow up for more music that weekend, consider seeing America at Jergel’s August 13, or The Bronx at Club Cafe August 14. The Cali punk band moonlights as Mariachi El Bronx, and you can catch them at Club Cafe the very next night, with support from Homeless Gospel Choir.

Also August 14, head to Allentown’s RE360 Warehouse to celebrate Black Forge Coffee House’s first anniversary. The pay-what-you-can event includes the debut of a collaborative cold brew mead with Apis Mead & Winery, burlesque from Kat De Lac, comedy from Matt Light, and live music from Dethlehem, Homeless Gospel Choir, and a rare performance from Molasses Barge.

On August 15, in addition to Mariachi El Bronx, there is a performance by dreamy Cali pop outfit Best Coast at Mr. Smalls. This is the duo’s first ever headlining gig in Pittsburgh; their only other stop in town was opening for Green Day in 2013.Stargazer Lilies open. Kinks-inspired garage rock band The Mystery Lights also have a gig the 15th, at Lawrenceville’s Spirit.

Ted Nugent roars into town August 16 for a night at Stage AE, but the biggest concert of the month happens August 17, when two of the biggest hip-hop artists on the planet, Drake and Future, perform at Consol Energy Center. The tour kicked off July 20 in Austin, where the 6 God performed a staggering 50-song set (on top of another 25+ from Future). The Austin show, of course, included a six-song encore with Future and Drake trading off on tracks from their collaborative mixtape,What A Time to Be Alive. If you don’t like Drake (?!), you can instead catch prog-rock legends Yes perform their Drama and . . .Topographic Ocean albums in their entirety.

Gov’t Mule returns to town August 18 at Stage AE for their Smokin’ Mule Summer Tour, with support from Blackberry Smoke. August 19 marks the kickoff of the three-day Skullfest. In true punk fashion venues still haven’t been determined, but more than 50 local and national bands are already scheduled to perform, including Wolf Eyes, Belgrado (Spain), and EEL.

On August 20Blues Traveler headlines a rare quadruple bill at Stage AE, including performances by The Wallflowers, G. Love & Special Sauce, and Howie Day. Across town, at the Rex Theater, the “King of Surf Guitar,” Dick Dale, who continues to tour at age 79 to pay for thousands of dollars of monthly medical expenses.

Club Cafe welcomes The Delta Saints August 22. The Nashville band plays “Bourbon-fueled Bayou-Rock” that’s part-blues, part-Southern roots rock. For a true taste of the South, come back to Club Cafe August 23 for Buckwheat Zydeco. Or, venture down East Carson a few blocks to catch sludge metal legends the Melvins at the Rex Theater, their first stop in town in over three years. Their new album, Basses Loaded, is the band’s 21st studio album. It features contributions from six different bassists as well as a gnarly cover of The Beatles’ “I Want to Tell You.”

On August 25, the inimitable Brian Wilson performs at the Benedum. The Beach Boys leader is on tour (with Al Jardine!) to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of Pet Sounds, which many critics regard as the greatest album . . . ever? Expect to hear Pet Sounds from start to finish alongside other Beach Boy classics.

For more classic rockers, catch David Crosby at the Palace in Greensburg August 26. That’s the same day alt-country/folk singer William Elliott Whitmore headlines at the Rex.

August ends on a strong note. First, Odd Future kingpin Tyler, the Creator visits Stage AE August 28, with an opening set from Taco. On the opposite end of the spectrum, Blink 182 (minus Tom DeLonge) headlines First Niagara the same evening, with support from A Day To Remember and All Time Low.

Finally, the face of modern blues rock and one of the best young guitar players today, Gary Clark Jr., headlines Stage AE August 30.

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NEXTpittsburgh

Powered by NEXTpittsburgh / Written by Maya Henry

Thanks to Carnegie Mellon, Pittsburgh is the first city to be featured in Jaunt, the free mobile app that allows users to navigate a curated collection of our city’s historic and modern architecture. More than 105 entries are featured, from buildings to bridges to industrial sites, including the Emerald Art Glass House, David McCullough Bridge, Carrie Furnaces and Fallingwater.

The app features a map view based on the GPS of the user’s phone and a grid view to see an overview of everything offered. Content can be sorted by architect, date, location, status, style or use.

Each entry contains a detailed architectural description and, in some cases, photographs and design drawings. There is also a limited number of unbuilt projects—such as Frank Lloyd Wright’s vision for the Point—as well as demolished buildings such as the Civic Arena.

Jaunt_Grid“Sometimes things that don’t get built trigger discussion,” says Rami el Samahy, principal of the design firm over,under which created the app. “And with something like the Civic Arena, love it or hate it, if you weren’t here prior to 2012, you may know nothing about that building, so you can imagine that in less than a generation that will be gone. Yet it was a key piece of the Pittsburgh skyline and a true Pittsburgh story constructed of Pittsburgh steel and designed by a Pittsburgh firm.”

While the design firm over,under, is located in Boston, the Pittsburgh connection comes through Rami el Samahy, who until recently was a professor at Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Architecture.

Pittsburgh is the first official Jaunt city, with Boston and Doha, Qatar to follow. Students from CMU’s Doha campus provided the information systems and designed the technology for the app but the designers wanted to start in Pittsburgh because of the amazing resources at the CMU Architecture Archives.

“It’s an exciting city to do, not an obvious choice,” says el Samahy. “Pittsburgh is a great city and has amazing examples of some of America’s finest architecture from all eras.”

Martin Aurand, architecture librarian and archivist at the CMU Architecture Archives, provided resources through the library to digitize original drawings and photographs that the public would not necessarily be able to easily access. He also provided “energy and knowledge” according to el Samahy, and much of the descriptive writing for the app.

Each description includes an “additional reading” section with recommended books and articles.

The team behind the app includes students from the CMU School of Architecture and from the CMU Qatar campus. Support for the project came from the Carnegie Mellon University Architecture Archives and the Berkman Faculty Development Fund.

Download the Jaunt Pittsburgh guide here.

 

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Looking for a job? ImaginePittsburgh.com‘s got ‘em — more than 20,000 open positions on our powerful, 10-county job search aggregator, updated nightly.

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